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Boston - AP - One of the explosive devices used in the Boston Marathon attack appears to have been placed in a metal pressure cooker packed with nails and ball bearings, CBS News has learned, as authorities appealed to the public Tuesday for amateur video and photos that might yield clues to the bombing.

The details on the explosives emerged as the chief FBI agent in Boston vowed “we will go to the ends of the Earth” to find those responsible.

A law enforcement source told CBS News senior investigative producer Pat Milton that one of the explosive devices appears to have been placed in a metal pressure cooker (a metal kitchen pot with a locked-down top) which had been placed in a black nylon bag or backpack. Investigators also found pieces of an electronic circuit board possibly indicating a timer was used in the detonation of the bomb.

A law enforcement official told CBS News that the two bombs that exploded were made to look like discarded property. It is still unknown if one or both bombs were in garbage cans. One may have been on the sidewalk.

The bombs were described as “low explosive,” but with “anti-personnel” packing. The official said there were apparently things like BB’s, ball bearings and nails in the bombs. This is consistent with doctors reporting shrapnel pulled from victims.

A doctor treating the wounded said one of the victims was maimed by what looked like ball bearings or BBs. Doctors also said they removed a host of sharp objects from the victims, including nails that were sticking out of one little girl’s body.

At the White House, meanwhile, President Barack Obama said that the bombings were an act of terrorism but that investigators do not know if they were carried out by an international organization, a domestic group or a “malevolent individual.”

He added: “The American people refuse to be terrorized.”

Across the U.S., from Washington to Los Angeles, police stepped up security, monitoring landmarks, government buildings, transit hubs and sporting events. Security was especially tight in Boston, with bomb-sniffing dogs checking Amtrak passengers’ luggage at South Station and transit police patrolling with rifles.

“They can give me a cavity search right now and I’d be perfectly happy,” said Daniel Wood, a video producer from New York City who was waiting for a train.

Similar pressure-cooker explosives have been used in Afghanistan, India, Nepal and Pakistan, according to a July 2010 intelligence report by the FBI and Homeland Security. Also, one of the three devices used in the May 2010 Times Square attempted bombing was a pressure cooker, the report said.

“Placed carefully, such devices provide little or no indication of an impending attack,” the report said.

The Pakistani Taliban, which claimed responsibility for the 2010 attempt in Times Square, has denied any role in the Boston Marathon attack.

The two bombs blew up about 10 seconds and around 100 yards apart Monday near the finish line of the 26.2-mile race, tearing off limbs, knocking people off their feet and leaving the streets stained with blood and strewn with broken glass. The dead included an 8-year-old boy and a 29-year-old woman.

“We started grabbing tourniquets and started tying legs. A lot of people amputated,” said Roupen Bastajian, a state trooper from Smithfield, R.I., who had just finished the race when he heard the explosions.

Federal investigators said no one had claimed responsibility for the bombings, which took place at the world’s best-known distance race, held every year on one of Boston’s biggest holidays, Patriots’ Day.

“We will go to the ends of the Earth to identify the subject or subjects who are responsible for this despicable crime, and we will do everything we can to bring them to justice,” said Richard DesLauriers, FBI agent in charge in Boston.

He said investigators had received “voluminous tips” and were interviewing witnesses and analyzing the crime scene.

Gov. Deval Patrick said that contrary to earlier reports, no unexploded bombs were found.

Boston police and firefighter unions announced a $50,000 reward for information leading to arrests in the bombing.

Law enforcement sources told CBS News’ Milton that a Saudi Arabian man who was being questioned by investigators is not being considered a suspect at this time, and it appears that he was a spectator who was injured in the attack.

At a news conference, police and federal agents repeatedly appealed for any video, audio and photos taken by marathon spectators, even images that people might not think are significant.

“There has to be hundreds, if not thousands, of photos and videos” that might help investigators, state police Col. Timothy Alben said.

Boston Police Commissioner Edward Davis said investigators also gathered a large number of surveillance tapes from businesses in the area and intend to go through the videos frame by frame.

“This is probably one of the most photographed areas in the country yesterday,” he said.

At least 17 people were critically injured, police said. At least eight children were being treated at hospitals. In addition to losing limbs, victims suffered broken bones, shrapnel wounds and ruptured eardrums.

Dr. Stephen Epstein of the emergency medicine department at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center said he saw an X-ray of one victim’s leg that had “what appears to be small, uniform, round objects throughout it — similar in the appearance to BBs.”

Dr. Richard Wolfe, chief of Emergency Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, told CBS News Tuesday that the injuries sustained in the bombing have been primarily shrapnel injury in the lower extremities.

“Some hand injuries, but mainly devastating injuries to limbs,” Wolfe said. “We have at least two amputations and a number of very serious wounds that require fairly aggressive care.”

Eight-year-old Martin Richard was among the dead, said U.S. Rep. Stephen Lynch, a family friend. The boy’s mother, Denise, and 6-year-old sister, Jane, were badly injured. His brother and father were also watching the race but were not hurt.

Krystle Campbell, a 29-year-old restaurant manager, also died in the bombing, WBZ Radio confirmed Tuesday afternoon. William Campbell told the AP that his daughter had gone with her best friend to take a picture of the friend’s boyfriend crossing the finish line.

Neighbor Betty Delorey said Martin loved to climb neighborhood trees and hop the fence outside his home.

About 23,000 runners participated in this year’s Boston Marathon. Nearly two-thirds of them had crossed the finish line by the time the bombs exploded, but thousands more were still completing the course.

Demi Clark, a runner from North Carolina who said she was the crossing finish line as the first blast went off, told CBSNews.com “blood was everywhere instantly.”

“Nobody knew what to do - after the second one went off we were like, ‘the city’s under attack,’” Clark said.

The attack may have been timed for maximum bloodshed: The four-hour mark is typically a crowded time near the finish line because of the slow-but-steady recreational runners completing the race and because of all the friends and relatives clustered around to cheer them on.

Davis, the police commissioner, said authorities had received “no specific intelligence that anything was going to happen” at the race. On Tuesday, he said that two security sweeps of the route had been conducted beforehand.

Patriots’ Day commemorates the opening shots of the American Revolution, at Concord and Lexington in 1775.

Richard Barrett, the former U.N. coordinator for an al Qaeda and Taliban monitoring team who has also worked for British intelligence, said the relatively small size of the devices in Boston and the timing of the blasts suggest a domestic attack rather than an al Qaeda-inspired one.

“This happened on Patriots’ Day — it is also the day Americans are supposed to have their taxes in — and Boston is quite a symbolic city,” said Barrett, now senior director at the Qatar International Academy for Security Studies.

Published in National News

ABC News - BOSTON

Eyewitnesses at the Boston Marathon described the ground shaking beneath their feet, smoke and "a lot of chaos" this afternoon when explosions killed two people and injured dozens.

 

Rachel Sibley, 22, was 50 feet from the finish line waiting for a friend to cross.

 

"All of a sudden I heard this bang that sounded like a cannon," she said. "You could see people looking up at the sky like there were fireworks, like a celebratory bang. The whole crowd waited for a moment, and then the second one went off. It was terrifying and absolute chaos.

 

"Everyone needed to get out of there," said Sibley. "I was ready to just start running, otherwise I'd be tackled. You could see the panic in people's faces.

 

"People started screaming and yelling at each other, trying to find friends and family members," she said. "People started running away from the finish line. There were sirens filling the streets and heading back to the finish line. It was absolutely terrifying."

 

One doctor in a medical tent about 150 yards from the explosion said he was immediately mobilized.

 

"We all went running over there and started to bring people into the medical tent," he said. "It was not good. Very bad. Like a war zone. 9/11 immediately came to mind."

 

He said the subways were immediately shut down and people were walking out of the area.

 

One eyewitness, Joe Conway, said he saw a giant cloud of gray smoke and ran to the food court at the Prudential Center.

 

"People were running out and didn't know what was going on," he told ABC News. "I had a baseball hat on and could feel the concussion. The baseball hat fell off my head."

 

Amanda Fahkkredine, 25, had just walked down into the Arlington subway station a few blocks from the finish line when the bombs went off. As two trains were pulling into the station, she heard it.

 

"You heard this huge noise and a rumble, and then two T transit police started yelling at everyone to get out of the station," Fahkkredine said. "They didn't seem to know what was going on."

 

Marathoners began hobbling up the subway stairs. Fahkkredine asked transit police what happened, but they told her they didn't know -- that everyone just had to get out.

 

"We heard it, and we no idea if there was a train crash or car accident," she said. "It wasn't like anything that I've ever heard or felt before. It was like an earthquake sounding like a car crash."

 

Back above ground, officers told pedestrians to stay away from landmarks.

 

Fahkkredine finally got word from her boyfriend that it was a bomb. Although Fahkkredine is not a Boston native, she graduated from Boston University in 2010 and calls the city home.

 

"I can't believe that just happened," she said. "It's shocking."

 

The first blast was reported at 2:42 p.m. near the finish line medical tent. By 3:15, authorities said a second device was reported at Saint James Avenue and Trinity Place.

 

The race was stopped about 3:28 p.m. EMS was tagging everyone affected with red wristbands and beginning transports to Boston hospitals.

 

A controlled explosion occurred at 4 p.m.

 

"People were running and screaming and crying in the area," college student Dan Lamariello told ABC News. "There was trampling, running It was a very scary scene."

 

Racer Jill Elaine Czarnik, 24, of Chicago, finished just 20 minutes after the explosion went off. She was standing in the hospitality area about a quarter mile from the finish line.

 

"I was in the first wave and I think most people [when the explosions went off] were in the second wave," said Czarnik, who didn't hear the explosion. "It's kind of like a movie scene. ... I think everyone is just kind of like in shock. ... I still feel a little shaky, but I feel safe now. ... It's just very weird ... because you don't know what it is and you're just very delusional because you just ran a marathon."

 

Phone lines were too busy for many people in the area to reach friends and relatives.

 

They're saying just send texts and not to make phone calls so people can reach their loved ones," said Czarnik.

 

Dan Lau of Boston, a 25-year-old engineer running his sixth marathon, said he was three or four blocks away from the chaos, crossing the finish line about 20 minutes earlier.

 

"It sounded like something from out of a movie," he said.

 

"Initially, folks were running towards a narrow, fenced-in exit spilling over to Newbury, but several bystanders diffused the panic and calmed us down," he said. "My first impression was either a truck hit a building or a subway train crashed. Then, when the second went off, my friend and I knew it was more serious. My friend immediately thought it was a bomb. To quote him, he said, 'That's definitely not thunder.'"

 

Runners further back were stopped by authorities. Josh Crary, one of 40 blind or visually impaired runners, had to stop at mile 20 in suburban Newton, west of the city.

 

"We stopped after my sister gave me a phone call," said Crary, a 27-year-old from Barnstead, N.H. "She said there had been an explosion and people were running away. Ten minutes later, the race was shut down."

 

His sister was in a VIP booth at the finish line. Crary said he and his guide were taken in by neighbors.

 

"Some folks took us into their home," he said. "It's almost impossible to call people because cell phones are busy. Hopefully, this is some sort of freak accident or explosion and not some other terrible scenario."

 

A Google document circulated on which Bostonians listed their contact information and offered up places for marathon runners to stay. As of three hours after the explosions, 708 people had offered up their homes.

 

As for not being able to finish the race, Crary said, "I could care less about the finish. There are much bigger things to worry about."

 

ABC News' Lauren Effron, Liz Neporent, Susanna Kim and Kelley Robinson contributed to this report.

 

 

Published in National News

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