Click for St. Louis, Missouri Forecast

// a href = ./ // St Louis News, Weather, Sports, The Big 550 AM, St Louis Traffic, Breaking News in St Louis

 
 
 

SIMFEROPOL, Ukraine (AP) — Lawmakers in Crimea called a March 16 referendum on whether to break away from Ukraine and join Russia instead, voting unanimously Thursday to declare their preference for doing so.

"This is our response to the disorder and lawlessness in Kiev," Sergei Shuvainikov, a member of the local Crimean legislature, said. "We will decide our future ourselves."

The 100-seat parliament in Crimea, which enjoys a degree of autonomy under current Ukrainian law, voted 78-0, with eight abstentions in favor of holding the referendum, and for joining Russia. Local voters will also be given the choice of deciding to remain part of Ukraine, but with enhanced local powers.

There was no immediate response from the Ukrainian central government to the vote. On Wednesday, Ukraine's prime minister told The Associated Press that Crimea would remain part of Ukraine.

In Moscow, a prominent member of Russia's parliament, Sergei Mironov, said he has introduced a bill to simplify the procedure for Crimea to join Russia and it could be passed as soon as next week, the state news agency ITAR-Tass reported.

On Tuesday, President Vladimir Putin said Russia had no intention of annexing Crimea, while insisting its residents have the right to determine the region's status in a referendum. Putin called a meeting of his Security Council on Thursday to discuss Ukraine.

A referendum had previously been scheduled in Crimea on March 30, but the question to be put to voters was on whether their region should enjoy "state autonomy" within Ukraine.

Earlier, Crimea's new leader said pro-Russian forces numbering more than 11,000 now control all access to the peninsula in the Black Sea and have blockaded all military bases that have not yet surrendered.

The West has joined the new Ukrainian leadership in Kiev in demanding that Russia pull its forces back from Crimea, but little progress was reported after a flurry of diplomatic activity in Paris on Wednesday involving U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov.

European Union leaders will meet for an emergency session in Brussels on Thursday to decide what sort of sanctions they can impose on Russia over its actions in Ukraine. Moscow has threatened to retaliate if any punitive measures are put in place.

Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk, in Brussels for the summit, said Russia was continuing to stir up trouble.

"We ask Russia to respond whether they are ready to preserves peace and stability in Europe or (whether) they are ready to instigate another provocation and another tension in our bilateral and multilateral relations," Yatsenyuk said.

In Simferopol, Crimea's capital, about 50 people rallied outside the local parliament Thursday morning waving Russian and Crimean flags. Among the posters they held was one that said "Russia, defend us from genocide."

"We are tired of revolutions, maidans and conflicts and we want to live peacefully in Russia," said one of the bystanders, Igor Urbansky, 35. "Only Russia can give us a peaceful life."

Maidan is the name of the downtown square in Kiev where tens of thousands of protesters contested the rule of Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych, who fled to Russia.

Not all in this city favored the lawmakers' action.

"This is crazy. Crimea has become Putin's puppet," said Viktor Gordiyenko, 46. "A referendum at gunpoint of Russia weapons is just a decoration for Putin's show. A decision on occupation has already been made."

Svetlana Savchenko, another Crimean lawmaker, said the choice she and her fellow deputies took in favor of joining Russia will force Moscow to make a decision.

"This is our principled position," she told The Associated Press. "Now the Russian Federation must begin a procedure - will it take us in or not."

Under the Soviet Union, Crimea belonged to the Russian Federation until it was transferred to Ukraine in 1954 by Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev.

Concern that the turmoil could engulf eastern Ukraine grew after hundreds of demonstrators — many chanting "Russia! Russia!" — stormed a government building on Wednesday in Donetsk, a major industrial center near the Russian border.

Clashes between protesters and police broke out early Thursday in Donetsk as police cleared demonstrators from the regional administration center. The Ukrainian flag once again was hoisted over the building, and about 100 Ukrainian Interior troops could be seen in and around it. Two large trucks were parked in front to block the approach.

The European Union on Wednesday extended $15 billion in aid to help support the new Ukrainian government, which took over in late February after months of protests drove out Yanukovych, the Moscow-supported president.

The EU also imposed asset freezes against 18 people held responsible for embezzling state funds in Ukraine, including Yanukovych, his son and some of his closest allies.

Crimea's new leader, Sergei Aksyonov, said his government was in regular contact with the Russian officials, including those in a large Russian delegation now in Crimea.

Speaking at Crimea's government meeting late Wednesday, Aksyonov said the strategic peninsula is fully under the control of riot police and security forces joined by about 11,000 "self-defense" troops. All or most of these troops are believed to be Russian, even though the Russian president and defense minister have denied sending in the military other than those stationed at the home port of Russia's Black Sea Fleet.

___

Read more...

BRUSSELS (AP) — Russia will face sanctions over its military incursion in Ukraine's Crimean peninsula unless it withdraws its troops or engages in credible talks to defuse the situation, European leaders said Thursday.

"We need to send a very clear message to the Russian government that what has happened is unacceptable and should have consequences," British Prime Minister David Cameron said as he arrived at an emergency meeting of the bloc's 28 leaders in Brussels.

But leaders appeared divided between nations close to Russia's borders and some western economic powerhouses — notably Germany — that were taking a more dovish line.

"Whether (sanctions) will come into force depends also on how the diplomatic process progresses," German Chancellor Angela Merkel said, noting that foreign ministers including Secretary of State John Kerry and Russia's Sergey Lavrov were holding talks again in Rome on Thursday.

"Russia today is dangerous," insisted Lithuanian President Dalia Grybauskaite, warning Moscow is seeking to expand its borders. "After Ukraine will be Moldova, and after Moldova will be different countries."

Among initial sanctions Moscow could face are the suspension of talks on visa liberalization and an economic agreement. More drastic steps like asset freezes and travel bans on Russian officials were unlikely to be adopted, not least because of Europe's close economic ties with Russia.

The United States has already suspended talks on an investment treaty and threatened further steps. NATO on Wednesday suspended most of its meetings with Russian officials, halting military cooperation and deciding to review all aspects of its relationship with Moscow.

"We cannot go back to business as usual," Merkel said.

Poland, Lithuania and other eastern European countries closer to Russia's borders pushed for a strong and united EU response including meaningful sanctions, but Germany, the Netherlands and others preferred defusing the crisis through diplomacy without alienating Moscow.

"We should do everything to give the route of de-escalation a chance and if we come to the conclusion today or the next 24, 48, 72 hours that de-escalation is not an option then obviously sanctions are back on the table," Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte said.

Russia is Europe's third-largest trading partner and its biggest gas and oil supplier. EU exports to Russia in 2012 totaled 123 billion euros ($170 billion), and European banks have about 200 billion euros in outstanding loans to Russia.

Cameron, Merkel, French President Francois Hollande and Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk held initial talks to coordinate their strategy before the summit. The 28 leaders then opened their meeting with talks with Ukraine's new prime minister, Arseniy Yatsenyuk.

"This is not just the Ukrainian-Russian crisis, this is the crisis in Europe," Yatsenyuk said at a meeting earlier Thursday with European Parliament leaders.

The EU proposed a $15 billion aid package for Ukraine Wednesday. The U.S. has so far pledged $1 billion and is working on a more comprehensive package, in coordination with the EU and the International Monetary Fund.

Ukraine's economy is faltering and the country is running out of cash. The government in Kiev estimates it will need $35 billion in bailout loans for this year and next.

The EU also offered Ukraine a wide-ranging free trade and economic agreement that would draw Kiev closer to Europe and help boost its economy.

At a protest close to the summit in Brussels, Ukrainian Myroslava Finiw said he wanted the leaders to take tough measures.

"Our expectations are that the European leaders will impose some sorts of sanctions on President (Vladimir) Putin and try and get the message through to him that these sorts of actions are just not acceptable "

Read more...

Latest News

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
Prev Next
UPDATE: Missing Belleville boy found safe

UPDATE: Missing Belleville boy found safe

St. Louis, MO (KTRS) - UPDATE: Good news for a Belleville father, his 11-year-old son has been found safe.   A SARAA Alert was issued Wednesday morning for DeA...

Universities examine bans of 'selfies' at graduations

St. Louis, MO (KTRS) - It may be coming to a college near you.......with graduation season upon us, bans on selfies are being suggested.   Two universities are the ...

Boeing offers buyouts to some St. Louis workers

Boeing offers buyouts to some St. Louis workers

(ST. LOUIS, AP) — The Boeing Co. is offering buyouts to some of its nonunion employees in the St. Louis region. The company on Tuesday sent an email to 12,000 workers an...

PRO-RUSSIAN INSURGENTS HOLD US JOURNALIST CAPTIVE

PRO-RUSSIAN INSURGENTS HOLD US JOURNALIST CAPTIVE

DONETSK, Ukraine (AP) — Pro-Russian gunmen in eastern Ukraine admitted on Wednesday that they are holding an American journalist, saying he was suspected of unspecified "bad act...

OBAMA OPENS JAPAN TRIP AT FAMOUS SUSHI RESTAURANT

OBAMA OPENS JAPAN TRIP AT FAMOUS SUSHI RESTAURANT

TOKYO (AP) — President Barack Obama on Wednesday opened a four-country Asia tour aimed at reassuring allies in the region that the U.S. remains a committed economic, military an...

© 2013 KTRS All Rights Reserved