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GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (AP) - Magnum P.I., Ron Burgundy and Ron Swanson would be impressed.

Organizers of an annual laugh festival in Michigan say they've broken the world record for the most people wearing fake mustaches.

Gilda's LaughFest is reporting that 1,544 people donned various shapes and sizes of dark `staches on Thursday, the festival's opening day in Grand Rapids.

The record is awaiting Guinness World Record certification.

If it sticks, the record would be the third set at the festival in as many years. Last year's kickoff event broke the record for the largest number of people wearing fake animal noses. The year before, it was people tossing rubber chickens.

LaughFest officials say the current record of 648 mustache-wearing participants was set in September at an event organized by the St. Louis Rams.
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BOSTON (AP) -- Coastal towns in Massachusetts were bracing for powerful waves at morning high tide and commuters were facing a tough drive as a nor'easter offshore was bringing waves of snow, strong wind and water from the Atlantic to New England.

Snowfall of 8 to 12 inches was forecast in central Massachusetts and parts of Rhode Island by Friday morning, with 6 to 10 inches in Boston and nearby areas.

"We are watching a conveyor belt of wave after wave of snow coming in over the Atlantic," said Alan Dunham, meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Taunton, Mass. "The morning commute will definitely be a challenge," he said, especially for those headed into Boston from the south.

Powerful waves and high winds were expected to cause more trouble than snow.

In Scituate, Mass., a shoreline town about 30 miles south of Boston, emergency management officials were worried about getting through Friday's high tide.

"I think that's going to be very dangerous," said Scituate Police Chief Brian Stewart. He said the town had advised people in flood-prone areas to leave during high tides that began Thursday, when no major damage was reported.

"Why put yourself at risk?" he said. "Folks have been through this before, and they know what happens in these areas. We're recommending that people in areas that have experienced coastal flooding to evacuate three hours before high tide."

In Salisbury, Mass., on the New Hampshire border, officials ordered evacuations for homes along several beachfront streets flooded during a February blizzard.

A coastal flood warning was in effect for east-facing shores in Massachusetts, with possible 3-foot surges at high tide.

"The one we are watching is on Friday morning, after another 12 hours of strong northeasterly winds piling more water up," the National Weather Service's Dunham said.

On Cape Cod, where the storm was expected to be mostly rain, officials were concerned about beach erosion. The area suffered extensive erosion from Superstorm Sandy in October and a major snowstorm last month.

"We've really gotten more erosion in the last six months than we've experienced in the last decade," said Sandwich Town Manager George Dunham. "These three storms are really taking a toll."

Some less severe beach erosion was forecast along the southern Maine coast, and up to six inches of snow in southern Maine and New Hampshire.

In Connecticut, where up to 6 inches of snow was expected by Friday, people were hoping for a break after a snowy winter.

"I'm just wishing we'd be done with snow," said Steve Edwards, a contractor in Newtown. "We just finally saw some green grass."

The late-winter storm buried parts of the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic before sweeping into New England.

In Virginia, three people were killed, including a 22 year old man who died after his vehicle ran off an icy road. Up to 20 inches of snow piled up in central and western Virginia, which had more than 200,000 outages at the height of the storm. The storm dumped 2 feet of snow in parts of neighboring West Virginia, closing schools in more than half the state and leaving more than 20,000 customers without power. Two North Carolina boaters were missing offshore after a third crew member was rescued Wednesday.
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Maplewood police are looking for the man who stole a pickup truck from the Maplewood Commons Shopping Center, and then assaulted the truck's owner when he tried to get it back.

Police say the victim had just finished shopping when he returned to his truck around noon Thursday to find someone driving off with it.

Maplewood Police Detective Matt Nibor says the truck's owner chased after him, jumping into the bed of the pickup. "The truck then started traveling at a high rate of speed down Hanley Road and then entered onto Highway 40 eastbound."

Detective Nibor says the victim broke out a window on the truck and the suspect pulled over. Then the suspect threw the victim out of the truck bed, beat him and left him along the roadside.

The victim is expected to recover.

Police are looking for the suspect and the stolen 1992 GMC Seirra with Missouri plates reading 1HN-375. The truck is maroon, with a darker maroon hood, white front fenders and a broken rear window.

The suspect is described as a light skin African American Male in his early 20s. He is about 5’7″ and weighs about 150 lbs. He was last seen wearing a black t-shirt and blue jeans.

Anyone with information call the Maplewood Police Department at 314-646-3621.
Friday, 08 March 2013 02:52
Published in Local News
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Railroad officials say the man struck and killed by an Amtrak train in Pacific Wednesday night had been cutting across the tracks when the accident happened. Police say 20 year -old Zachary Brady was walking home from his job at a fast-food restaurant when Amtrak's Missouri River Runner train struck and killed him.

Police say this is the fourth serious accident along the Union Pacific line near the Fourth Street crossing in the last eight years -- two others were also fatal.

An Amtrak official told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that most accidents involving pedestrians could be avoided if people wouldn't trespass on railroad tracks. Trespasser fatalities have become the leading cause of railroad deaths.
Friday, 08 March 2013 02:29
Published in Local News
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