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LONDON (AP) — Prince William and his wife Kate presented their newborn son to the world for the first time Tuesday, drawing whoops and wild applause from well-wishers as they revealed the new face of the British monarchy — though not, yet, his name.

"We're still working on a name. So we'll have that as soon as we can," William told scores of reporters gathered outside St. Mary's Hospital as he cradled the child.

The young family's debut public appearance was the moment the world's media had been waiting for, but the royal couple showed no sign of stress in the face of dozens of flashing cameras. Instead the couple, both 31, laughed and joked with reporters as they took turns holding their baby son, who appeared to doze through it all.

"He's got her looks, thankfully," William said, referring to his wife, the Duchess of Cambridge, as the newborn prince squirmed in his arms and poked a tiny hand out of his swaddling blanket, almost like a little royal wave.

"He's got a good pair of lungs on him, that's for sure," William added with a grin. "He's a big boy. He's quite heavy."

The infant is third in line to become monarch one day, after his grandfather, Prince Charles, and William.

But for now, the media and the public were focused on getting all the details of new parenthood they could from the couple: How they feel, what the baby looks like, and even who changed the diapers.

Kate, wearing a simple baby blue dress, said William had already had a go at changing the first one.

"He's very good at it," she said.

Asked how she felt, she said: "It's very emotional. It's such a special time. I think any parent will know what this feeling feels like."

And William poked fun at his own lack of hair when he responded with a wink to a reporter's question about the baby's locks: "He's got way more than me, thank God."

It was a much more relaxed scene than the one when Princess Diana and Prince Charles carried their newborn son, William, out to pose for photographs on the same hospital steps in 1982.

Charles, wearing a dark suit, tie and boutonniere, spoke awkwardly to reporters. By contrast, William, dressed in jeans and a blue shirt with the sleeves rolled up, joked with the assembled media and addressed some by name. At his side, Kate waved and smiled broadly, the blue sapphire engagement ring that had been Diana's on her finger.

The photographs snapped Tuesday are likely to be reprinted for decades as the baby grows into adulthood and his role as a future king, and onlookers were elated to witness the historic moment.

"William gave us a wave as they drove away, so it was perfect. Days like this really bring the country together," said Katie Allan, 26, from Bristol, England.

The couple re-entered the hospital to place the child in a car seat before re-emerging to get into a black Range Rover. With William at the wheel, they drove away. Palace officials said they will head to an apartment in Kensington Palace and spend the night there.

The birth marks a new chapter for William and Kate, who had enjoyed a quiet life away from the public eye in Anglesey, Wales, since their wedding in April 2011.

The couple had been living in a small Welsh cottage while William — known as Flight Lieutenant Wales — completed his term as a search-and-rescue pilot.

Now that they are a family, they are moving to a much larger apartment in Kensington Palace in central London, where William spent most of his childhood and where it will be much more difficult to keep a low profile and avoid the press.

Earlier Tuesday, William's father, Charles, and his wife, Camilla, as well as Michael and Carole Middleton — Kate's parents — visited the young family at the hospital.

Charles called the baby "marvelous," while a beaming Carole Middleton described the infant as "absolutely beautiful."

It was not immediately clear when Queen Elizabeth II would meet the newborn heir. The queen was hosting a reception at Buckingham Palace Tuesday evening, and was due to leave for an annual holiday in Scotland in the coming days.

Meanwhile, much of Britain and parts of the Commonwealth were celebrating the birth of a future monarch.

News that Kate gave birth to the 8 pound, 6 ounce (3.8 kilogram) boy on Monday was greeted with shrieks of joy and applause by hundreds of Britons and tourists gathered outside the hospital's private Lindo Wing and the gates of Buckingham Palace.

Revelers staged impromptu parties, and large crowds crushed against the palace gates to try to catch a glimpse — and a photograph — of the golden easel placed there to formally announce the birth.

Hundreds were still lining up outside the palace gates Tuesday to get near the ornate easel.

In London, gun salutes were fired, celebratory lights came on, and bells chimed at Westminster Abbey, where William and Kate wed in a lavish ceremony that drew millions of television viewers worldwide.

The baby is just a day old — and may not be named for days or even weeks — but he already has a building dedicated to him.

Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd said an enclosure at Sydney's Taronga Park Zoo would be named after the prince as part of a gift from Australia. The government will also donate $9,300 on the young prince's behalf toward a research project at the zoo to save the endangered bilby, a rabbit-like marsupial whose numbers are dwindling in the wild.

British media joined in the celebration, with many newspapers printing souvenir editions.

"It's a Boy!" was splashed across many front pages, while Britain's top-selling The Sun newspaper temporarily changed its name to "The Son" in honor of the tiny monarch-in-waiting.

"His First Royal Wave" read the headline on the Times front page that accompanied a photo of the newborn, his tiny fist poking out from the white blanket he was swaddled in.

The birth is the latest driver of a surge in popularity for Britain's monarchy, whose members have evolved, over several decades of social and technological change, from distant figures to characters in a well-loved national soap opera.

"I think this baby is hugely significant for the future of the monarchy," said Kate's biographer, Claudia Joseph.

For some, though, it was all a bit much.

The wry front page on British satirical magazine "Private Eye" — which simply read "Woman Has Baby" — summed up the indifference some felt about the news.

"It's a baby, nothing else," said Tom Ashton, a 42-year-old exterminator on his way to work. "It's not going to mean anything to my life."

___ Associated Press writers Jill Lawless, Raphael Satter, Gregory Katz, Paisley Dodds, Maria Cheng and James Brooks in London, Rod McGuirk in Canberra, Australia, and Kristen Gelineau in Sydney, Australia, contributed to this report.
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RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Pope Francis' decision to shun a major security detail for his visit to Brazil exemplifies his view of what the Roman Catholic Church should be doing: Go out into the streets. Spread the faith. Recapture the dynamism that other denominations have been using to snap up souls.

Upon his arrival in Rio de Janeiro this week, that philosophy helped produce a defining vignette of his young papacy: The pope rolling down the window to touch the adoring crowds who surrounded his Fiat as his driver and bodyguards struggled to get him on his way.

His call for a more missionary church, seeking out the faithful in the most marginal of places, will get even more traction Thursday when he visits one of Rio's shantytowns, or favelas, and meets a family inside their home. But while his subordinates may appreciate that message, many are uneasy about the lengths he seems willing to go to deliver it.

"He's used that phrase that we have to get out to the streets, we can't stay locked up in our sacristies, we can't be navel-gazing all the time," U.S. Cardinal Timothy Dolan said in interview Tuesday in Rio de Janeiro.

Dolan, however, expressed concern over Monday's swarm and said security might need to be tightened for Francis' own good.

"I love him and I don't want another conclave. We just finished one so we don't need him to be hurt at all," Dolan said.

Francis' car was mobbed after the lead car in his motorcade made a wrong turn and got blocked by buses and taxis, enabling tens of thousands of frenzied Brazilians to surround him. But even along the planned route, there were few fences and no uniformed police or armed forces, as would be expected for a visiting head of state. Just a few dozen plainclothes Vatican and Brazilian security officers trotted alongside Francis' car, at times unable to keep the crowds at bay.

Top Vatican officials met Tuesday with senior Brazilian officials to go over the pope's security and made some changes: On Wednesday, Francis will use only the closed car when he travels in Rio to a hospital to meet with patients, rather than switch to the open-air car midway through as had been planned.

The Vatican spokesman, the Rev. Federico Lombardi, insisted the change was taken merely to "simplify" the pope's travel and was not a reflection of increased concern about his safety.

Brazilian security officials defended their handling of the pope's tour through Rio, saying Tuesday that an evaluation of his arrival by federal police, the mayor's office and highway police was "positive, since there was no incident involving the pope or with any of the faithful."

Authorities in Brazil said earlier that about 10,000 police officers and more than 14,000 soldiers would take part in the overall papal security plan, but on Monday virtually no uniformed officers were seen.

Andreas Widmer, a former Swiss Guard who protected Pope John Paul II from 1986 to 1988, said the scenes from Rio were reminiscent of some of the more hair-raising trips John Paul took, even after he was wounded in a 1981 assassination attempt in St. Peter's Square. He sees it as part of the pontiff's job.

"Fundamentally one has to see that the pope is not like a president," Widmer said Tuesday in a telephone interview from Boston. "You can shut the president in a house and he never sees any normal people. The pope's office is a ministry, and a ministry cannot be impeded by security."

"You cannot be pope and not see people," Widmer said.

Sao Paulo Cardinal Odilo Scherer said that "nothing happened when the pope was stuck in traffic" and that "we shouldn't exaggerate the psychosis of security" when it comes to protecting the pope.

It is Francis' wish that his security not be "militarized," Lombardi said.

Francis stopped to kiss babies and shake hands thrust into the window of his car, and once he reached Rio's center, he switched to his open-air vehicle and drove right back into the crowds.

The moment was particularly unnerving in light of sometimes violent anti-government protests that have been going on across Brazil for a month. It also was embarrassing for security officials who are charged with keeping order during next year's World Cup and the 2016 Olympics.

"I was so surprised!" said the Rev. Joseph Tan, a priest from the Philippines who echoed the reaction of many in Rio for the papal visit.

"In the Philippines, people would have gathered to get a glimpse, but nothing like what we saw," Tan said. "But that's the pope's personality. He was just being himself."

Francis was dubbed the "slum pope" in his native Argentina for the amount of time he spent in dangerous areas while he was archbishop there. And in a speech that some say helped get him elected pope, then-Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio told colleagues that the church must "move toward the peripheries, not only geographic but also existential."

Francis is in Brazil for World Youth Day, a church event that takes place about every three years and brings together young Catholics from around the world.

A cold rain Tuesday night didn't stop upward of 500,000 faithful from gathering on Rio's Copacabana beach to mark the event. Clergy celebrated the opening Mass on a huge white stage covered with a bright red carpet as the crowd held aloft flags from dozens of nations.

But Rio's woes didn't stop: The city's main subway lines ground to a halt for two hours, just before the Mass. Officials said an energy cable snapped in a main station.

The pope had no public events Tuesday. On Wednesday, he travels to Aparecida, where the governor said 1,800 police will provide security. Plans are for Francis to use his open-air popemobile for the one-kilometer (half-mile) trip from a helipad to the Aparecida basilica, where he'll celebrate Mass.

He's traveling to the town to venerate the Virgin of Aparecida, Brazil's patron saint. About 200,000 faithful are expected to pack into the normally sleepy hamlet, where Francis is expected to greet crowds from a balcony.

Francis normally uses the open-air vehicle in St. Peter's Square, which is ringed with Vatican and Italian police, and where the faithful are fenced into pens as bodyguards trail him. And despite the change to a closed car for the pope's Wednesday drive in Rio, church officials gave no indication of any shift away from his plan to use the open popemobile in substantially less controlled conditions this week: at a welcome speech on Copacabana beach Thursday, a Way of the Cross procession Friday, and a weekend vigil and Mass in a rural part of Rio.

Lombardi said the pontiff decided not to use his bulletproof popemobile at those events so he could be closer to people and interact with them.

Security experts said the scene on Rio's streets Monday show how challenging it is to strike the right balance in protecting the outgoing pope.

"From the point of view of a head of state, and the pope is a head of state, it's unacceptable what happened," said Paulo Storani, a Rio-based security consultant who spent nearly 30 years on the city's police force and was a captain in an elite unit used to clear out slums. "On the other hand, in the case of a head of a church and having a charismatic figure like this pope, the situation is different because he wants to be close to the people."

Ignacio Cano, a researcher at the Violence Analysis Center at Rio de Janeiro State University, said that although authorities would like to surround the pope with protection, that "goes against the message he wants to impart, which is one of simplicity, openness and approximation."

___ Associated Press writers Marco Sibaja and Vivian Sequera in Rio de Janeiro and Stan Lehman in Sao Paulo contributed to this report. ___ Bradley Brooks on Twitter: www.twitter.com/bradleybrooks Nicole Winfield on Twitter: www.twitter.com/nwinfield
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   The manufacturer of the Plan B One Step morning-after contraceptive has been granted exclusive rights by the FDA to market their drug over-the-counter without age restrictions. The decision was released earlier this week.

   The Food and Drug Administration approved Teva Pharmaceuticals' Plan B One Step for over the counter sale...no prescription or proof of age required.  In its decision, the FDA granted a three year period during which Teva can sell its' single tablet product exclusively on pharmacy shelves, while generic drugs will still require a prescription for young women 16 and younger.

   Most metro St. Louis pharmacies carry Teva's Plan B, which is a two-pill dosage and some already have the Plan B One Step in the pharmacy. The FDA decision will now move that product on to the store shelves.

Wednesday, 24 July 2013 04:49
Published in Local News
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   The St. Louis County Library is looking for new leadership after the library director resigned without warning.  

   Many library staffers were stunned to learn by email Tuesday that St. Louis County Library Director Charles Pace had resigned.  The email from the president of the library board of trustees, Lynn Beckwith Junior, didn't say why Pace had stepped down.  

   Pace has been at the helm of the 20 branch library system for the past seven years.  He's credited with helping to persuade voters to approve the library's first tax-rate increase in almost 30 years.  But he was also fined by the Missouri Ethics Commission in March for failing to put the library's name on some materials promoting the tax increase.  

   Beckwith's email indicated that Pace's resignation is retroactive to July 12.

Wednesday, 24 July 2013 04:41
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