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   OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — The family of a 13-year-old California girl who was declared brain dead after suffering complications from sleep apnea surgery has gotten her the feeding and breathing tubes that they had been fighting for.
   Christopher Dolan, the attorney for the girl's family, said doctors inserted the gastric tube and tracheostomy tube Wednesday at the undisclosed facility where Jahi McMath was taken Jan. 5.
   The procedure was a success, Dolan said, and Jahi is getting the treatment that her family believes she should have gotten 28 days ago, when doctors at Children's Hospital Oakland first declared her brain dead.
   Jahi underwent tonsil surgery Dec. 9, then began bleeding heavily before going into cardiac arrest and being declared brain dead Dec. 12.
   Her mother has refused to believe Jahi is dead and went to court to prevent her daughter from being taken off a ventilator.
   Jahi's uncle, Omari Sealey, said Monday that she is now being cared for at a facility that shares her family's belief that she still is alive.
   The new facility has "been very welcoming with open arms," Sealey said. "They have beliefs just like ours."
   Neither Dolan nor the family would disclose the name or location of that facility, which took the eighth-grader after a weekslong battle by her family to prevent Children's Hospital Oakland from removing her from the breathing machine that has kept her heart beating.
   But medical experts said the ventilator won't work indefinitely and caring for a patient whom three doctors have said is legally dead is likely to be challenging because — unlike someone in a coma — there is no blood flow or electrical activity in either her cerebrum or the brain stem that controls breathing.
   The bodies of brain dead patients kept on ventilators gradually deteriorate, eventually causing blood pressure to plummet and the heart to stop, said Dr. Paul Vespa, director of neurocritical care at the University of California, Los Angeles, who has no role in McMath's care. The process usually takes only days but can sometimes continue for months, medical experts say.
   "The bodies are really in an artificial state. It requires a great deal of manipulation in order to keep the circulation going," Vespa said.
   Brain-dead people may look like they're sleeping, he added, but it's "an illusion based on advanced medical techniques."
   Sealey, the girl's uncle, said Monday that Jahi's mother, Nailah Winkfield, is relieved her persistence paid off and "sounds happier." He criticized Children's Hospital for repeatedly telling Winkfield they did not need her permission to remove Jahi from the ventilator because the girl was dead.
   Sealey told reporters Monday that Jahi traveled by ground from Children's Hospital to the unnamed facility and there were no complications in the transfer, suggesting she may still be in California.
   The $55,000 in private donations the family has raised since taking the case public helped cover the carefully choreographed handoff to the critical care team and transportation to the new location, Sealey said.
   "If her heart stops beating while she is on the respirator, we can accept that because it means she is done fighting," he said. "We couldn't accept them pulling the plug on her early."
   Meanwhile, an advocacy group is facing sharp criticism for using Jahi's case to try to raise money.
   The nonprofit Consumer noted in an email solicitation that it fights for patient safety for families like Jahi's and that it had drafted a proposed November ballot measure that would raise medical malpractice award limits in California.
   Dolan, the family attorney, is a board member of Consumer Attorneys of California, the prime group funding the ballot initiative to lift the cap on pain and suffering awards. But he said he was dismayed that Consumer Watchdog used Jahi's name as a fundraising tool.
   "Using Jahi's case as an example is wrong and that is not what this case is about," he said in a text message to the Associated Press.
   Hospital spokesman Sam Singer also criticized the use of Jahi's case for fundraising, calling it "tasteless and thoughtless."
   Consumer Watchdog Executive Director Carmen Balber said the funds were being solicited for the organization's patient safety program, not the political campaign, and none of the money would go to the ballot measure.
   "We thought we were being clear," she said. "This email has been construed in ways we didn't expect."
   Consumer Watchdog's Christmas Eve email to supporters prominently mentioned the Jahi McMath case to support the need for its advocacy work and for lifting the state's 38-year-old cap on medical malpractice awards.
   "Hospitals like Children's actually have an incentive to let children like Jahi die," the email said. "If kids injured by medical negligence die, the most their families can recover is $250,000. ... If children who are victims of medical negligence live, hospitals are on the hook for medical bills for life, which could be millions."
   If it gets on November's ballot and passes, the Troy & Alana Pack Patient Safety Act would raise the cap on medical malpractice awards to about $1.2 million, a limit that would increase based on inflation, said Bob Pack, chair of the campaign committee. He said the group has collected about 500,000 signatures and wants 300,000 more by March 25 to assure there are enough valid ones to qualify for the ballot.
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   If you normally feed the meter when you park in the City of St. Louis, there is good news — at least for a few days.  Parking meter violations won't be enforced this week.  

   Because of the snow, the St. Louis Treasurer's office isn't issuing parking tickets.  

   They're also not ticketing drivers who park on snow routes because the city didn't declare a snow emergency.

   Parking meter enforcement will resume in the city on Monday.

Thursday, 09 January 2014 03:20
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   It's another blow to a struggling North County mall.  The Macy's store at Jamestown is closing.  A clearance sale begins Monday.  
   The announcement came Wednesday.  Macy's officials say its part of a reorganization that will save the company $100 million per year.  The company will close five under-performing stores and cut 2,500 jobs across the country.    
   A spokesperson for the retailer says many of the 88 Jamestown employees will be offered positions at other Macy's locations in the St. Louis area.  The rest will be given severance packages.  
   Currently, Macy's employs 175,000 employees and operates 841 stores nationwide.
 
Thursday, 09 January 2014 03:14
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   CHICAGO (AP) - People who signed up recently for health insurance with Blue Cross Blue Shield of Illinois now have until Jan. 30 to pay their first month's premium and still get coverage for all of January.
   Company spokesman Greg Thompson says customers must pay their first month's premium before coverage for medical benefits begins. But claims for services received between Jan. 1 and when the first payment is received will be processed retroactively.
   Blue Cross has the most customers in the state's individual market.
   Thompson says the company is extending the payment deadline to give customers extra time to plan their household budgets.
   The extension applies to people who bought a Blue Cross plan either on the new insurance marketplace or directly from the insurance company.
 
Thursday, 09 January 2014 03:12
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