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One group says they have no plans to sue the Mehlville School District.

The Children's Education Alliance of Missouri had been discussing filing a lawsuit on behalf of families in the Riverview Gardens School District.

In a news release Thursday, CEAM said the Mehlville and Kirkwood Districts have not identified spots for all students who wanted to transfer. They believe Mehlville and Kirkwood officials have been negotiating in good faith and are trying to find a positive resolution for all parties involved. 

 

Published in Local News

   Mehlville Superintendent Dr. Eric Knost says the district is making every effort to place students transferring in from Riverview Gardens without compromising the education of any student in the district.

   Knost released a statement Monday evening in response to a lawsuit from the Children’s Education Alliance of Missouri on behalf of three Riverview Gardens parents.  

   Mehlville has limited the number students it will accept from the unaccredited district in an effort to retain current class size limits and staffing levels, but the school-choice advocacy group says there's room for more than the 216 the district has accepted.  

   Knost says the District will work with legal counsel to respond appropriately to the court action.  

Published in Local News

CHICAGO (AP) - A Cook County judge is hearing arguments on whether to dismiss a case challenging Illinois' ban on same-sex marriage.

The lawsuit being heard Tuesday before Circuit Judge Sophia Hall involves 25 couples who filed for marriage licenses in Cook County and were denied.

However, Cook County State's Attorney Anita Alvarez has refused to defend the state's ban, which defines marriage as between a man and a woman. She says it violates the state constitution's equal protection clause. Attorney General Lisa Madigan has argued against the ban because the case brings the constitutionality of state laws into question.

Clerks from downstate were allowed to intervene and defend the ban.

Illinois approved civil unions in 2011, but attempts to legalize gay marriage have stalled.

 

Published in Local News

ST. JOSEPH, Mo. (AP) - A former employee of the Missouri Department of Transportation is suing the agency, claiming age discrimination.

A lawsuit filed in Buchanan County says 64-year-old Elaine Justus worked at MoDOT's northwest district from 1997 until early 2013, largely in community relations.

The complaint says MoDOT developed a cost-cutting plan that included lists identifying employees by age and tenure. The lawsuit also says a northwest district manager created a similar list sorted by retirement eligibility and called it the "Buzzard List."

The St. Joseph News-Press reports the lawsuit says in 2011, a manager asked Justus her age. Justus says she was told a month later she wouldn't be reappointed. She says she was later demoted and was terminated in January.

MoDOT spokesman Bob Brendel says the department doesn't comment on pending litigation.

 

Published in Local News

BALLWIN, Mo. (AP) - The founder of the Castlewood Treatment Center for eating disorders is no longer leading the center in St. Louis County or its facility in California following lawsuits by former clients.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Mark Schwartz and his partner, Lori Galperin, stepped down from daily operations in December, though the change wasn't confirmed until Tuesday.

Castlewood director Nancy Albus is now CEO.

Four women have filed lawsuits since 2011 against Castlewood and Schwartz alleging they were hypnotized into believing they were members of satanic cults, and implanted with false memories of sexual abuse. The center has denied the claims. Schwartz is scheduled to give a deposition in July.

 
Published in Local News

DENVER (AP) - A federal judge in Denver is considering an injunction after ruling that nearly 250 Abercrombie & Fitch Co. and J.M. Hollister LLC clothing stores are unfriendly to the disabled.

The judge agreed in March with the Colorado Cross-Disability Coalition that the retailers that cater to a hip, young clientele limited access for customers in wheelchairs.

He said the only remedy under the Americans With Disabilities Act is an order to fix the problems, and individuals can't be compensated.

The lawsuit was filed on behalf of several Colorado customers who say they had trouble getting into stores and the sales countertops are too high.

The companies say they complied with all construction standards in effect at the time.

New Albany, Ohio-based Abercrombie & Fitch is the parent company of Hollister.

 
Published in National News

   Ellisville's ousted mayor is making good on his promise to appeal his impeachment in court.  Former Mayor Adam Paul filed an appeal in St. Louis County Circuit Court Wednesday asking a judge to overturn his April 8th impeachment.  

   But he didn't stop there.  

   Paul also filed a defamation lawsuit against his accusers.  The suit claims City Attorney Paul Martin, Council Member Matt Pirrello, City Manager Kevin Bookout and resident Katie James harmed his reputation by making unsubstantiated allegations against him.  

   Paul hand delivered a copy of the lawsuit to the city council at last night's council meeting.  

   The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the new city council, which took office Wednesday night, has decided not to appoint an interim mayor to take Paul's place.  The council plans to proceed with a special election, but the details have not yet been determined.

Published in Local News

27-year-old Sandra Lupo alleges she was pushed out of her job after brain surgery left her with buzz cut hair and a healing scar that made it too painful to wear a wig.

Lupo had worked as a waitress at a St. Peters, Mo., Hooters since April 2005 but took a leave from her job for a few weeks last summer to have a cranial mass removed.

 Lupo had the support of her manager, who visited her in the hospital and suggested when she was ready to return to work that she wear a "chemo cap" or jewelry items "to distract from her lack of hair and the visibility of her cranial scar," court documents said.

On July 16, 2012, doctors gave Lupo clearance to go back to work at Hooters, where she worked to put herself through nursing school.

Shortly before she returned to work, Lupo and her immediate manager met with the Hooters regional manager who said Lupo would be required to wear a wig while at work, according to court documents.

Lupo told him "she did not have a wig and that she could not afford a wig, as they range in cost between several hundred and several thousands of dollars," according to the lawsuit, adding that the regional manager did not offer to pay for the wig.

After her manager approached her again regarding a wig, Lupo said she borrowed one and tried to wear it at work. But it "caused extreme stress to her body because of the surgery and the healing wound," according to court records.

Lupo said her manager then reduced her hours to the point where she was making so little income that she was forced to quit, which made her ineligible for unemployment benefits.

"[Lupo's] physical injury was an actual disability from her surgery which limited the major life activity of working when such work required a wig to be worn," court documents said.

In a complaint filed with the Missouri Commission on Human Rights, Lupo said she never believed her customers were ever "offended" by her appearance at the chain, which is known for its hot wings and servers clad in tight white tank tops and orange hot pants.

"My customers were not offended, and were in fact curious about the obvious scar from my surgery," she wrote in the complaint.

The lawsuit was moved from St. Charles County Circuit Court to U.S. District Court in St. Louis last week at the request of Georgia-based Hooters.

"Hooters of America believes the lawsuit is without foundation, denies the accusations and has filed a motion that the lawsuit be dismissed," a spokesman wrote in an email to ABCNews.com.

Lupo, whose attorney said Lupo now works as a trauma nurse, was not immediately available for comment.

The Americans With Disabilities Act prohibits employers from discriminating against qualified individuals who have a disability. This includes having a physical or mental impairment, a history of having an impairment or the perception of having one.

Marcia McCormick, an associate professor of law at St. Louis University, said Lupo's surgery to remove a brain mass qualifies as a disability, but that Hooters could argue that her appearance was a bona fide qualification for her job.

"In the disability context, if Hooters is to say she's not as attractive now without this wig, if they're selling her attractiveness that might be a real function of her job and mean she isn't qualified by the Americans With Disabilities Act," McCormick said.

"Most companies can't say s something like this, but Hooters sells this experience," she said.

 

 
Published in Local News

ST. LOUIS (AP) - The U.S. government says Tyson Foods has agreed to pay roughly $4 million in civil penalties to settle alleged violations related to eight accidental releases of anhydrous ammonia that happened over a four-year span and caused one death.

 

The Justice Department and Environmental Protection Agency says the deal in a St. Louis federal court with the nation's biggest meat company involves alleged Clean Air Act violations at Tyson sites in Missouri, Kansas, Iowa and Nebraska.

 

The government says the incidents in questioned happened between 2006 and 2010.

 

Arkansas-based Tyson says it cooperated with the EPA and immediately addressed the agency's concerns.

 

As part of the settlement, Tyson also will provide $300,000 to help purchase emergency response equipment for fire departments in nine communities where it has plants.

Published in Local News
Friday, 29 March 2013 11:41

Illinois man wins hole-in-one lawsuit

EDWARDSVILLE, Ill. (AP) -- A southwestern Illinois meat cutter who sued after a prize for his hole in one during a charity golf tournament wasn’t paid out as promised has carded a legal victory.

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The (Alton) Telegraph reports that a Madison County judge has awarded Donald Beiermann of Godfrey an $11,000 judgment against the Alton church that sponsored the tournament and the Godfrey course that hosted it.

<br><Br>

Beiermann scored the ace on the 17th hole, where a sign promised such a feat would win an $11,000 trip for four to California’s Pebble Beach Golf Course.

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A specialty insurer refused to pay, arguing the contract provided that the hole in one must be on a hole at least 165 yards long. Biermann’s ace, witnessed by three companions, was on a hole 149 yards long.

Published in Local News
Page 4 of 5

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