Click for St. Louis, Missouri Forecast

// a href = ./ // St Louis News, Weather, Sports, The Big 550 AM, St Louis Traffic, Breaking News in St Louis

Online pharmacy:fesmag.com/tem

Have you a sex problem? Please visit our site:fesmag.com/medic

Site map
 
 
 

CENTENNIAL, Colo. (AP) - Three FBI experts say they found four types of explosives and other chemicals when they tested items found in Colorado theater shooting defendant James Holmes' apartment.

The experts testified Tuesday at a pretrial hearing to determine whether they will testify at Holmes' trial. They shed little new light on the case and mostly answered questions about testing methods.

Holmes pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity to charges of killing 12 people and injuring 70 in the July 2012 attack.

Prosecutors and defense lawyers are arguing over evidence that could be used to weaken his insanity claim, including homemade bombs found in his apartment.

Police have said the bombs were intricately planned and were meant to divert officers from the theater. Prosecutors could cite that as evidence Holmes was sane.

Read more...

   NEWTOWN SQUARE, Pa. (AP) — The already remarkable life of Holocaust survivor George Horner is about to take another exceptional turn.

   The 90 year old pianist will make his orchestral debut with renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma on Tuesday night at Boston's Symphony Hall. And they'll be playing music composed 70 years ago at the Nazi prison camp where Horner was incarcerated.

   "It's an extraordinary link to the past," said concert organizer Mark Ludwig.

   The performance will benefit the Terezin Music Foundation, an organization dedicated to preserving the work of artists and musicians killed in the Holocaust.

   Led by Ludwig, the foundation is named for the town of Terezin, site of an unusual Jewish ghetto in what was then German-occupied Czechoslovakia. There, even amid death and hard labor, Nazi soldiers allowed prisoners to stage artistic performances.

   Horner played piano and accordion in the Terezin cabarets, including tunes written by fellow inmate Karel Svenk. On Tuesday, Horner will play two of Svenk's works solo — a march and a lullaby — and then team up with Ma for a third piece called "How Come the Black Man Sits in the Back of the Bus?"

   Svenk did not survive the genocide. But his musical legacy has, due in part to a chance meeting of Ludwig, a scholar of Terezin composers, and Horner, who never forgot the songs that were written and played in captivity.

   Still, Ludwig found it hard to ask Horner to perform pieces laden with such difficult memories.

   "To ask somebody who ... played this in the camps, that's asking a lot," said Ludwig.

   Yet Horner, now a retired doctor living near Philadelphia, readily agreed to what he described as a "noble" mission. It didn't hurt that he would be sharing the stage with Ma — even if he thought Ludwig was joking at first.

   "I told him, 'Do you want me to swallow that one?'" Horner recalled with a laugh. "I couldn't believe it, because it's a fantastic thing for me."

   The program features additional performances by Ma and the Hawthorne String Quartet. In a statement, Ma said he's glad the foundation is "giving voice through music to those whose voices have been tragically silenced."

   Horner was 21 when he was freed by Allied soldiers in 1945 after serving time at Terezin, Auschwitz and Buchenwald. His parents and sister perished in the camps.

   And though his back still bears the scars of a Nazi beating, he remains spry and seems much younger than his 90 years.

   When Horner found out about the duet with Ma, Ludwig said, "he was so excited, to me he sounded like a teenager."

   ___

   Online: www.tmfgala.org

Read more...

SPARKS, Nev. (AP) - Police say it was a student who opened fire at a Nevada middle school today, killing a staff member who was trying to protect other children.

The suspected gunman also is dead, but authorities say no shots were fired by law enforcement, though more than 150 officers responded.

The shooting erupted outside Sparks Middle School shortly before classes began this morning. Two other students were critically injured in the incident. They were both taken to a nearby hospital, where one is out of surgery. Police say the other as doing well.

Students from the middle school and next door elementary school were evacuated to the nearby high school, and classes were canceled. At the evacuation center, parents walked with their arms around their children, some of whom were in tears.

The city of Sparks lies just east of Reno.

Read more...

Latest News

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
Prev Next

Police Investigate DeSoto Shooting

HILLSBORO, Mo. (AP) - A Jefferson County woman suffered minor injuries after reporting a shooting into her home. County Sheriff Oliver "Glenn" Boyer says the shooting occurr...

GAUGE OF US ECONOMY UP FOR 3RD STRAIGHT MONTH

GAUGE OF US ECONOMY UP FOR 3RD STRAIGHT MONTH

WASHINGTON (AP) — A measure of the U.S. economy's health rose in March for the third consecutive month, a sign of stronger growth after harsh winter weather caused the economy's...

MARATHON WATCH: 'WE'RE TAKING BACK OUR RACE'

MARATHON WATCH: 'WE'RE TAKING BACK OUR RACE'

A look at the 118th running of the Boston Marathon. TAKING BACK RACE: The elite men and first wave of amateur runners have started. Boston Marathon race director Dave Mc...

SKOREAN PRESIDENT: FERRY CREW ACTIONS 'MURDEROUS'

SKOREAN PRESIDENT: FERRY CREW ACTIONS 'MURDEROUS'

JINDO, South Korea (AP) — South Korean President Park Geun-hye said Monday that the captain and some crew members of the sunken ferry committed "unforgivable, murderous behavior...

Rev. Joseph Jiang Released On Bail

 A 31-year-old St. Louis priest accused of sexually abusing a grade school student is free on bail.   The Rev. Joseph Jiang was released on Friday from the cit...

Ameren Missouri Rates Questioned

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri utility regulators plan to hear evidence in June on a pair of cases challenging the electricity rates charged by Ameren Missouri.   ...

Lobbyists Woo Missouri Lawmakers

ST. LOUIS (AP) - Industry and special interest groups have spent more than $200,000 in the last three years on trips for Missouri lawmakers.   Records reviewed by T...

© 2013 KTRS All Rights Reserved