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BOSTON (AP) — As it seeks investors, the Cape Wind offshore wind farm faces fast-approaching benchmarks that it must meet or risk missing out on hundreds of millions of dollars in critical funding for the oft-delayed project.

To qualify for a tax credit that would cover a major portion of its capital costs, the wind farm off the Massachusetts coast must begin construction by Dec. 31 or prove it's incurred tens of millions of dollars in costs by then.

Also, a $200 million investment from a Danish pension fund is conditioned on whether developers can finance the rest of the $2.6 billion project by year's end.

Cape Wind isn't discussing progress on construction, the tax credit or financing. But spokesman Mark Rodgers said the project remains on track and will be built.

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WASHINGTON (AP) — Way past midnight at an upscale Swiss hotel, negotiations hit the nitty-gritty on a breakthrough deal about Iran's nuclear program. There was a flurry of calls with the White House, pizza and talk about a tiny, but critical, asterisk in what became the final agreement.

Throughout it all, a band was crooning Irish folk tunes that seemed to grow louder as the tedious negotiations continued into the wee hours of Sunday morning.

On one side of the hotel's first floor, negotiators talked about centrifuges and uranium, hoping to ink the first step of a comprehensive agreement that could affect the world balance of nuclear weapons technology. Security was tight and an armored personnel carrier was parked outside.

On the other side of the floor, men in tuxedos and women in strapless gowns were partying at a noisy charity event that could be watched from the lobby below.

The final marathon day of negotiations began around 9 a.m. Saturday. Diplomats from Iran, the U.S., Britain, Russia, France, China and Germany as well as the European Union filed into the lobby, their security teams in tow. Their first challenge: negotiating a phalanx of reporters and photographers camped out.

After the arrivals, hours passed with no hint of what was happening behind closed doors.

About 10 hours into the negotiations, Secretary of State John Kerry secretly slipped out of the hotel for about 30 minutes to buy truffles at Auer Chocolatier, a five-generation family business not far from Lake Geneva. The sweets were for his wife and family for Thanksgiving dinner.

The negotiations also paused for dinner. The U.S. delegation dined on different kinds of pasta ordered into Kerry's suite.

Throughout the day, Kerry felt that there was a chance for an agreement, a senior State Department official told reporters traveling on his plane Monday as it returned from Europe. But there was a point when he became dubious because Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif "looked anxious and appeared to be under pressure from Tehran," according to the official, speaking on condition of anonymity because the individual was not authorized to discuss the talks by name.

The U.S. delegation was in touch with the White House throughout the day. Kerry called President Barack Obama mid-afternoon local time to update him on the discussions and once again before midnight. After that call, the U.S. team ordered pizza and Kerry broke out some of his chocolates to share with the group.

Kerry was not completely convinced that a deal was going to be reached until well after midnight. At their final three-way meeting, Kerry, Zarif and the European Union's top diplomat, Catherine Ashton, managed to work through some — though not all — of the remaining issues, the official said.

"The last meeting ... was pretty much make or break," the official said. The agreement, however, was not actually struck at that meeting, according to the official, who declined to provide details on exactly when the deal was sealed.

An official with the group of the six world powers said that toward the end, Russia and China were willing to sign an agreement that had less stringent language. The official, who was not authorized to publicly disclose by name details about the negotiations, said that left the U.S. pressing past midnight — and sometimes alone — for tougher restrictions on uranium enrichment and a heavy water reactor that Iran is building in Arak, southwest of Tehran.

Heavy water reactors produce plutonium, which also can be used to make nuclear weapons — something Iran has long said it has no plans to do.

The negotiations were so detailed that there was even discussion about an asterisk, found on the fourth and final page of the document's preamble. It states that going forward, the principle of "nothing is agreed until everything is agreed" applies. It means that in the future, as Iran's nuclear work continues, everything must be agreed upon by all parties.

As Saturday became Sunday, the lobby bar closed, but the band played on. The musicians were belting out the Irish ballad "Danny Boy," and partiers were doing their best to line-dance in their finest.

The scene below was starkly different. Those waiting for the talks to end were dozing on couches, making the lobby of the swank hotel look more like a bus depot. Phone and laptop chargers were piggy-backed into every available electrical outlet, making sure they were juiced-up and ready to relay news of a deal to the world.

Shortly before 2 a.m., there was a flurry of activity on one side of the lobby. The Iranian news agency ISNA had just reported that the negotiators had resolved their differences. There was a mad dash to find anyone who spoke Farsi. Other Iranian news agencies sent out similar reports. Depending on the translator, a deal had been reached, or a deal was close at hand.

The U.S. delegation played down the reports, saying foreign ministers still had to meet, and advised reporters to stay tuned and drink coffee to stay awake.

It would be another hour — the 18th and last hour of negotiations — before it was official. Michael Mann, a spokesman for Ashton, the EU's top negotiator, tweeted around 3 a.m. that the parties had "reached agreement."

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   WASHINGTON (AP) — Pushing back hard, President Barack Obama forcefully defended the temporary agreement to freeze Iran's disputed nuclear program on Monday, declaring that the United States "cannot close the door on diplomacy."

   The president's remarks followed skepticism of the historic accord expressed by some U.S. allies abroad as well as by members of Congress at home, including fellow Democrats. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, one of the fiercest opponents of the six-month deal, called it a "historic mistake" and announced he would be dispatching a top envoy to Washington to try to toughen the final agreement negotiators will soon begin hammering out.

   Obama, without naming names, swiped at those who have questioned the wisdom of engaging with Iran.

   "Tough talk and bluster may be the easy thing to do politically, but it's not the right thing to do for our security," he said during an event in San Francisco.

   The weekend agreement between Iran and six world powers — the U.S., Britain, France, Russia, China and Germany — is to temporarily halt parts of Tehran's disputed nuclear program and allow for more intrusive international monitoring. In exchange, Iran gains some modest relief from stiff economic sanctions and a pledge from Obama that no new penalties will be levied during the six months.

   Despite the fanfare surrounding the agreement, administration officials say key technical details on the inspections and sanctions relief must still be worked out before it formally takes effect. Those talks will tackle the toughest issues that have long divided Iran and the West, including whether Tehran will be allowed to enrich uranium at a low level.

   Iran insists it has a right to enrich uranium for peaceful purposes, and many nuclear analysts say a final deal will almost certainly leave Iran with some right to enrich. However, that's sure to spark more discord with Israel and many lawmakers who insist Tehran be stripped of all enrichment capabilities. British Foreign Secretary William Hague said he expects the deal to be fully implemented by the end of January.

   European Union officials say their sanctions could be eased as soon as December. Those restrictions affect numerous areas including trade in petrochemicals, gold and other precious metals, financial transfers to purchase food and medicine, and the ability of third countries to use EU-based firms to insure shipments of Iranian oil again.

   The groundwork for the accord was laid during four clandestine meetings between U.S. and Iranian officials throughout the summer and fall. An earlier meeting took place in March, before Iranians elected President Hassan Rouhani, a cleric who has taken more moderate public stances than his predecessor. Details of the secret talks were confirmed to The Associated Press by three senior administration officials.

   The U.S. and its allies contend Iran is seeking to produce a nuclear bomb — of particular concern to Israel, which fears an attack — while Tehran insists it is merely pursuing a peaceful nuclear program for energy and medical purposes.

   Even with the criticism, for Obama the sudden shift to foreign policy presents an opportunity to steady his flailing second term and take some attention off the domestic troubles that have plagued the White House in recent weeks, especially the rollout of his signature health care law. Perhaps with his presidential standing — and the strength of the rest of his term — in mind, he made sure on Monday to draw a connection between the nuclear pact and his long-declared willingness to negotiate directly with Iran.

   "When I first ran for president, I said it was time for a new era of American leadership in the world, one that turned the page on a decade of war and began a new era of engagement with the world," he said. "As president and as commander in chief, I've done what I've said."

   Later, at a high-dollar fundraiser in Los Angeles, Obama said he will not take any options off the table to ensure Iran does not develop a nuclear weapon.

   However, he added, "I've spent too much time at Walter Reed looking at kids 22, 23, 24, 25 years old who've paid the kind of price that very few of us in this room can imagine on behalf of our freedom not to say that I will do every single thing that I can to try to resolve these issues without resorting to military conflict."

   The temporary accord is historic in its own right, marking the most substantial agreement between Iran and the West in more than three decades. The consequences of a permanent deal could be far more significant, lowering the prospects of a nuclear arms race in the volatile Middle East and perhaps opening the door to wider relations between the U.S. and Iran, which broke off diplomatic ties following the 1979 Islamic revolution.

   However, Obama and his advisers know the nuclear negotiations are rife with risk. If he has miscalculated Iran's intentions, it will vindicate critics who say his willingness to negotiate with Tehran is naive and could inadvertently hasten the Islamic republic's march toward a nuclear weapon. Obama also runs the risk of exacerbating tensions with key Middle Eastern allies, as well as members of Congress who want to deepen, not ease, economic penalties on Iran.

   Despite Obama's assurances that no new sanctions will be levied on Iran while the interim agreement is in effect, some lawmakers want to push ahead with additional penalties. A new sanctions bill has already passed the House, and if it passes the Senate, Obama could have to wield his veto power in order to keep his promise to Tehran.

   Even some members of Obama's own party say they're wary of the deal struck in Geneva.

   "I am disappointed by the terms of the agreement between Iran and the P5+1 nations because it does not seem proportional," said Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., a close ally of the White House. "Iran simply freezes its nuclear capabilities while we reduce the sanctions."

   The Senate's Democratic majority leader, Harry Reid, was noncommittal on the subject of sanctions on Monday. On NPR's Diane Rehm Show, he said that when lawmakers return from their Thanksgiving break, "we will take a look at this to see if we need stronger sanctions ... and if we need work on this, if we need stronger sanctions I am sure we will do that."

   Some lawmakers are also concerned about concessions the world powers made to Iran on its planned heavy water reactor in Arak, southwest of Tehran. Two congressional aides said that under the terms of the agreement, international monitors will not being able to watch live feeds of any activity at Arak and will instead retrieve a recording from the preceding day during each daily inspection.

   The aides were not authorized to provide details of the agreement and demanded anonymity.

   On the positive side, Michael Desch, a political science professor at the University of Notre Dame, compared Obama's diplomatic overtures to Secretary of State Henry Kissinger's secret outreach to China in the 1970s, which paved the way for the historic opening of U.S. relations with the Asian nation.

   "Then, as now, critics complained that the U.S. was in danger of being hoodwinked by a radical and violent regime that was playing us for a sucker," Desch said. "An opening to Iran could potentially not only contain its nuclear program but set the stage for broader changes there as well."

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