Click for St. Louis, Missouri Forecast

// a href = ./ // St Louis News, Weather, Sports, The Big 550 AM, St Louis Traffic, Breaking News in St Louis

Online pharmacy:fesmag.com/tem

Have you a sex problem? Please visit our site:fesmag.com/medic

 
 
 
UNITED NATIONS (AP) - U.N inspectors say chemical weapons have been used in the Syrian conflict, definitely in a widely publicized Aug. 21 attack near Damascus and probably in four other locations between March and late August.
 
The report by U.N. chemical weapons experts led by Swedish professor Ake Sellstrom did not determine whether the government or opposition were responsible for the alleged attacks.
 
Sellstrom issued an initial report on Sept. 16 which concluded that evidence collected in the Ghouta area of Damascus following an Aug. 21 attack provided "clear and convincing evidence that surface-to-surface rockets containing the nerve agent sarin were used." Graphic video footage showed dozens of people gasping for air and bodies lined up.
 
Thursday's report said evidence indicated chemical weapons were also probably used in Khan al Assal, Jobar, Saraqueb and Ashrafiah Sahnaya.
Read more...

   A proposed congressional budget agreement would avoid a government shutdown in January and set spending for defense and domestic programs. It would:

   —Establish overall non-war-related discretionary spending for the current fiscal year at $1.012 trillion and $1.014 trillion for fiscal 2015. Discretionary spending is the money approved by Congress each year for agency operations. The House budget level had been $967 billion and the Senate $1.058 trillion for the year that runs through next Sept. 30. Fiscal 2013 discretionary spending was $986 billion.

   —Ease the across-the-board "sequester" spending cuts by $63 billion over two years, split between defense and domestic programs. In the current fiscal year, defense would be set at a base budget of $520.5 billion and domestic programs at $491.8 billion.

   —Increase airline security fees from $5 to $11.20 for a typical round-trip ticket starting July 1, 2014. That would raise $13 billion over 10 years. Current fees are $2.50 per leg with a maximum fee of $10 for a round-trip with connecting flights or $5 for a nonstop round-trip fare.

   —Reduce retirement benefits for working-age military retirees. The cost-of-living adjustment would be modified equal to inflation minus 1 percent. The changes would be phased in, with no change in the current year, a 0.25 percent reduction in December 2014 and a 0.5 percent decrease in December 2015. The change would not apply to retirees who left the service because of disability or injury. It would apply to retirees under the age of 62. The change would save $6 billion.

   —Increase by 1.3 percentage points the pension contributions paid by federal civilian workers hired after Jan. 1, 2014. Raise $6 billion.

   —Restrict access to Social Security death records to prevent identity thieves from filing fraudulent tax returns. Save $269 million.

   —Raise premiums paid by corporations to the Pension Benefit Guarantee Corp. to guarantee pension benefits. Raise $8 billion.

   —Eliminate a requirement that the Maritime Administration reimburse other federal agencies for additional costs associated with shipping food aid on U.S. ships. Saves $731 million.

   —Cancel $1.6 billion in unobligated balances in Justice and Treasury Department funds that seize assets from criminals.

   —Cap the maximum government payment for contract employees at $487,000, indexed to inflation. Agencies could make exceptions for scientists, engineers and other specialists.

   —Give the Treasury Department greater access to prison data to prevent prisoners from claiming improper payments. Saves. $80 million.

   —Approve a U.S.-Mexico agreement on oil and gas exploration in waters outside their exclusive economic zones.

   —Permanently extend a requirement that states receiving mineral lease payments contribute to the federal government's administrative costs. Saves $415 million.

   —Extend Bureau of Customs and Border Protection user fees. Raises $7 billion.

Read more...

   JOHANNESBURG (AP) — The man accused of faking sign interpretation next to world leaders at Nelson Mandela's memorial told a local newspaper that he was hallucinating and hearing voices.

   Thamsanqa Jantjie did describe his qualifications for being a sign language interpreter, but told The Star he works for an interpreting company that paid him $85 for interpreting Tuesday's event. He told Radio 702 Thursday he's receiving treatment for schizophrenia and had an episode while on stage.

   Jantjie did not address allegations by sign language experts that he faked interpretation for the Mandela memorial attended by scores of world leaders and broadcast internationally.

   The Star quoted him as saying: "I tried to control myself and not show the world what was going on. I am very sorry, it's the situation I found myself in."

Read more...

Latest News

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
Prev Next
MO High Court overturns 30 yr. worker's comp precedent

MO High Court overturns 30 yr. worker's comp precedent

   The Missouri Supreme Court has overturned 30 years of precedent with a ruling that gives greater legal protections to injured workers who are fired from their jobs....

UPDATE: Tiny puppy rescued from north city drain pipe

UPDATE: Tiny puppy rescued from north city drain pipe

   A tiny puppy is safe again after St. Louis firefighters rescued him from a 10 foot deep storm drain.      Crews were called to the 4900 block of ...

Supremacist faces murder charges in KC area deaths

Supremacist faces murder charges in KC area deaths

OVERLAND PARK, Kan. (AP) — The white supremacist charged in shootings that left three people dead at two Jewish community sites in suburban Kansas City made his first court appe...

Solemn tributes mark anniversary of Boston Marathon bombings

Solemn tributes mark anniversary of Boston Marathon bom…

BOSTON (AP) — Survivors, first responders and family members of those killed came together Tuesday to mark the anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombing with solemn ceremonies....

Former ESL Mayor forms SuperPAC to support Rauner

Former ESL Mayor forms SuperPAC to support Rauner

   Politics makes strange bedfellows, and that's certainly the case in the Illinois Governor's race.      Former East St. Louis mayor Carl Officer t...

MO house gives 1st round nod to E-cig. regs

MO house gives 1st round nod to E-cig. regs

   The Missouri House is advancing a bill aimed at keeping electronic cigarettes out of the hands of children and young teens.      E-cigarettes are...

Former Cardinal Hal Smith dies

Former Cardinal Hal Smith dies

Former St. Louis Cardinal's catcher Hal Smith has died.  Edwards Funeral Home in Fort Smith, Arkansas says he died Saturday at age 82.  Smith first signed with the Car...

© 2013 KTRS All Rights Reserved