Click for St. Louis, Missouri Forecast

// a href = ./ // St Louis News, Weather, Sports, The Big 550 AM, St Louis Traffic, Breaking News in St Louis

Online pharmacy:fesmag.com/tem

Have you a sex problem? Please visit our site:fesmag.com/medic

 
 
 
Susan Smith-Harmon

Susan Smith-Harmon

UM board weighing 2014 tuition hikes

Friday, 22 November 2013 02:16 Published in Local News

   Tuition is probably going up at all four University of Missouri campuses next year.  

   The university's Board of Curators met yesterday at the UMSL campus to begin weighing a recommendation that an increase be tied to the nation's inflation rate.  The rate is based on the Consumer Price Index for December and won't be known until next month.  The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that budget projections expect it to be about 1.7 percent.  

   The board could vote on the amount of the increase in January.  

   Some non-resident students will pay even more.  Graduate and undergraduate students the Columbia campus will see a 3 percent hike.  And graduate students at Missouri University of Science and Technology in Rolla will pay 6 percent more next fall.

   St. Louis County Police Chief Tim Fitch is asking the FBI to help in the investigation of suspicious financial dealings at the county health department.  Chief Fitch has asked the FBI to conduct a forensic investigation into the financial records involving former health department administrator Ed Mueth.  

   County police are trying to determine if Mueth had co-conspirators when he allegedly used a bogus computer company to steal millions of dollars from the county before committing suicide.  

   Chief Fitch says his department has received hundreds of pages of subpoenaed records and wants to question dozens of people over Mueth's financial dealings.

Evolution debate again engulfs Texas Board of Ed

Friday, 22 November 2013 00:54 Published in National News

   AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The Texas Board of Education used a late-night meeting to preliminarily approve new science textbooks for classrooms across the state Thursday, but it blocked signing off on a major new biology text until alleged "errors" in lessons over the theory of evolution are checked by outside experts.

   The vote just before midnight did not reject the biology book by Pearson, one of the country's largest publishers. But it delayed approval until three board members appoint a trio of outside experts to check concerns.

   Textbook and classroom curriculum battles have long raged in Texas pitting creationists — those who see God's hand in the creation of the universe — against academics who worry about religious and political ideology trumping scientific fact. At issue this time are proposed high school biology books that could be used across the state at least through 2022.

   State law approved two years ago means school districts can now choose their own books and don't have to adhere to a list recommended by the Board of Education — but most have continued to use approved books.

   The issue is important nationally since Texas is so large that many books prepared for publication in the state also are marketed elsewhere around the country.

   Publishers from around the country submitted proposed textbooks this summer, but committees of Texas volunteer reviewers — some nominated by socially conservative current and former Board of Education members — raised objections. One argued that creationism based on biblical texts should be taught in science classes, while others objected that climate change wasn't as settled a scientific matter as some of the proposed books said.

   Pearson and many other major publishers weren't willing to make suggested major edits and changes, however.

   That promoted some of the board's socially conservative members to call for delaying approval of the book because of concerns including how long it took Earth to cool and objection to lessons about natural selection because "selection operates as a selective but not a creative force."

   Members outside the socially conservative bloc claimed their colleagues waited until the dead of night to try and impose ideological edits.

   "To ask me — a business degree major from Texas Tech University — to distinguish whether the Earth cooled 4 billion years ago or 4.2 billion years ago for purposes of approving a textbook at 10:15 on a Thursday night is laughable," said Thomas Ratliff, a Republican from Mount Pleasant.

   He added: "I believe this process is being hijacked, this book is being held hostage to make political changes."

Latest News

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
Prev Next
MO High Court overturns 30 yr. worker's comp precedent

MO High Court overturns 30 yr. worker's comp precedent

   The Missouri Supreme Court has overturned 30 years of precedent with a ruling that gives greater legal protections to injured workers who are fired from their jobs....

UPDATE: Tiny puppy rescued from north city drain pipe

UPDATE: Tiny puppy rescued from north city drain pipe

   A tiny puppy is safe again after St. Louis firefighters rescued him from a 10 foot deep storm drain.      Crews were called to the 4900 block of ...

Supremacist faces murder charges in KC area deaths

Supremacist faces murder charges in KC area deaths

OVERLAND PARK, Kan. (AP) — The white supremacist charged in shootings that left three people dead at two Jewish community sites in suburban Kansas City made his first court appe...

Solemn tributes mark anniversary of Boston Marathon bombings

Solemn tributes mark anniversary of Boston Marathon bom…

BOSTON (AP) — Survivors, first responders and family members of those killed came together Tuesday to mark the anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombing with solemn ceremonies....

Former ESL Mayor forms SuperPAC to support Rauner

Former ESL Mayor forms SuperPAC to support Rauner

   Politics makes strange bedfellows, and that's certainly the case in the Illinois Governor's race.      Former East St. Louis mayor Carl Officer t...

MO house gives 1st round nod to E-cig. regs

MO house gives 1st round nod to E-cig. regs

   The Missouri House is advancing a bill aimed at keeping electronic cigarettes out of the hands of children and young teens.      E-cigarettes are...

Former Cardinal Hal Smith dies

Former Cardinal Hal Smith dies

Former St. Louis Cardinal's catcher Hal Smith has died.  Edwards Funeral Home in Fort Smith, Arkansas says he died Saturday at age 82.  Smith first signed with the Car...

© 2013 KTRS All Rights Reserved