Click for St. Louis, Missouri Forecast

// a href = ./ // St Louis News, Weather, Sports, The Big 550 AM, St Louis Traffic, Breaking News in St Louis

 
 
 
Susan Smith-Harmon

Susan Smith-Harmon

By TIM SULLIVAN and DAVID McHUGH Associated Press
 
PEREVALNE, Ukraine (AP) - Warning that it was "on the brink of disaster," Ukraine put its military on high alert Sunday and appealed for international help to avoid what it feared was the possibility of a wider invasion by Russia.
 
Outrage over Russia's military moves mounted in world capitals, with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry calling on President Vladimir Putin to pull back from "an incredible act of aggression."
 
A day after Russia captured the Crimean peninsula without firing a shot, fears grew in the Ukrainian capital and beyond that Russia might seek to expand its control by seizing other parts of eastern Ukraine. A senior U.S. official said Washington now believes that Russia has complete operational control of Crimea, a pro-Russian area of the country, and has more than 6,000 air, naval and ground forces in the region.
 
Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk said there was no reason for Russia to invade Ukraine and warned that "we are on the brink of disaster."
 
"We believe that our western partners and the entire global community will support the territorial integrity and unity of Ukraine," he said Sunday in Kiev.
 
World leaders rushed to try to find a diplomatic solution to the crisis.
 
NATO held an emergency meeting in Brussels, Britain's foreign minister flew to Kiev to support its new government and Kerry was to travel to Ukraine Tuesday. The U.S., France and Britain debated the possibility of boycotting the next Group of Eight economic summit, to be held in June in Sochi, the host of Russia's successful Winter Olympics.
 
In Kiev, Moscow and other cities, thousands of protesters took to the streets to either decry the Russian occupation or celebrate Crimea's return to its former ruler.
 
"Support us, America!" a handful of protesters chanted outside the U.S. Embassy in Kiev. One young girl held up a placard reading: "No Russian aggression!"
 
"Russia! Russia!" the crowd chanted in Moscow.
 
Kerry, interviewed Sunday on U.S. television news shows, talked about boycotting the G-8 summit, as well as possible visa bans, asset freezes and trade and investment penalties against Russia. Kerry said all the foreign ministers he had talked to were prepared "to go to the hilt" to isolate Russia.
 
NATO issued a statement saying it "condemns Russia's military escalation in Crimea" and demanding that Russia respect its obligations under the U.N. charter. Ukraine is not a NATO member, meaning the U.S. and Europe are not obligated to come to its defense, but the country has taken part in some alliance exercises.
 
"We are on a very dangerous track of increasing tensions," German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier said. "(But) it is still possible to turn around. A new division of Europe can still be prevented."
 
So far, however, Ukraine's new government and other countries have been powerless to counter Russia's tactics. Armed men in uniforms without insignia have moved freely about Crimea for days, occupying airports, smashing equipment at an air base and besieging a Ukrainian infantry base.
 
Putin has defied calls from the West to pull back his troops, insisting that Russia has a right to protect its interests and those of Russian-speakers in Crimea and elsewhere in Ukraine. His confidence is matched by the knowledge that Ukraine's 46 million people have divided loyalties. While much of western Ukraine wants closer ties with the 28-nation European Union, its eastern and southern regions like Crimea look to Russia for support.
 
Russia has long wanted to reclaim the lush Crimean Peninsula, part of its territory until 1954. Russia's Black Sea Fleet pays Ukraine millions every year to be stationed at the Crimean port of Sevastopol and nearly 60 percent of Crimea's residents identify themselves as Russian.
 
During a phone conversation Sunday with German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Putin "directed her attention to the unrelenting threat of violence from ultranationalist forces (in Ukraine) that endangered the life and legal interests of Russian citizens," according to a Kremlin statement.
 
The statement also said "the measures taken by Russia are fully adequate with regard to the current extraordinary situation."
 
Ukraine's new government came to power last week following months of pro-democracy protests against a pro-Russian president, Viktor Yanukovych, and his decision to turn Ukraine toward Russia instead of the EU. Yanukovych fled to Russia after more than 80 people were killed in the protests. He insists he's still president.
 
Ukraine's acting president, Oleksandr Turchynov, put Ukraine's armed forces on alert, calling up reserves for training and stepping up security at nuclear power plants, airports and other strategic locations. However, no overt military actions by Ukraine were seen.
 
Turchynov also moved to consolidate the new government's authority in eastern Ukraine, appointing 18 new regional governors and enlisting the support of the wealthy businessmen known as oligarchs. The new appointees included two oligarchs in the eastern cities of Dneprotrovsk and Donetsk, as big business and the new Ukrainian government united against Russia.
 
Ukraine's richest man, Rinat Akhmetov, urged business, ordinary people and the government to join together, saying Sunday that the use of force and "illegal action from outside" were "impermissible."
 
"I call upon all my fellow citizens to unity for the sake of a whole and undivided Ukraine ... Our strength is in the solidarity of business, government and society," said Akhmetov, whose SCM Group has 300,000 employees and interests in steel, coal and mining.
 
Faced with the threat from Russia, "the national elite has consolidated around the new government," political analyst Vadim Karasyov of the Institute for Global Strategies told The Associated Press. "The biggest businessmen and oligarchs have agreed to head key regions. This is a very good sign for the new government."
 
Russian troops, meanwhile, pulled up to the Ukrainian military base at Perevalne on the Crimean Peninsula in a convoy Sunday that included at least 13 trucks and four armored vehicles with mounted machine guns. The trucks carried 30 soldiers each and had Russian license plates.
 
In response, a dozen Ukrainian soldiers, some with clips in their rifles, placed a tank at the base's gate, leaving the two sides in a tense standoff. It appeared to be the first known case of outmatched Ukrainians standing up to Russian military might.
 
Unidentified soldiers were also seen cutting power to the headquarters of the Ukrainian Naval forces in Crimea — whose own commander defected later Sunday and pledged his allegiance to "the people of Crimea."
 
In Kiev, a Ukrainian security official said the head of the Ukrainian Navy — Adm. Denis Berezovsky — had been dismissed and faces a treason investigation after declaring his allegiance to the pro-Russian government of the Crimea region and offering no resistance to the Russian troops.
 
The speaker of Crimea's legislature, Vladimir Konstantinov, was quoted as saying local authorities do not recognize the new government in Kiev. He said a planned referendum on March 30 would ask voters about the region's future status.
 
A convoy of hundreds of Russian troops was also seen heading toward Simferopol, the regional capital of Crimea. Armed men in military uniforms without markings strolled around Simferopol's central plaza, Lenin Square, outside its Council of Ministers building.
 
"It is very important that we all do everything we can to calm tensions," said British Foreign Minister William Hague, who flew to Kiev on Sunday.
 
He said he has urged Russian officials to "speak directly to the Ukrainians" but so far they had not.
 
President Barack Obama talked with Putin by telephone for 90 minutes Saturday and expressed his "deep concern" about "Russia's clear violation of Ukrainian sovereignty." Obama warned that Russia's "continued violation of international law will lead to greater political and economic isolation."
 
In Moscow, at least 10,000 people bearing Russian flags marched freely through the city Sunday, while a few dozen demonstrating on Red Square against the invasion of Ukraine were quickly detained by Russian riot police.
 
"We understand that the West wants to attack us and seize this territory. It (the West) is dangerous to us," said Victor Sidelin, a Moscow resident at the march.
 
——————
 
McHugh reported from Kiev, Ukraine. AP writers Greg Keller in Paris, Laura Mills and Lynn Berry in Moscow, Tom Strong in Washington, Tim Sullivan in Crimea, Greg Katz in London and Geir Moulson in Berlin contributed to this story.

Who's First? MoDOT's Plowing Priorities

Sunday, 02 March 2014 16:41 Published in Around Town
   As the snow and sleet continue to fall in the St. Louis area, most of the interstate highways were in fairly good shape Sunday afternoon.  Most of the surface streets were still fairly icy.  More snow is expected Sunday night into Monday, and the storm is wide-spread, covering much of the state.  So Missouri Transportation officials must prioritize snow and ice removal.  MoDOT officials issued the following statement reguarding their plowing priorities:
 
   MoDOT adjusts its practices to deal differently with each storm and tries to return roads to near-normal driving conditions as soon as possible after a storm's end.  Because MoDOT doesn't have enough workers or trucks to clear every highway immediately after a snowstorm, the department has set priorities for which roads to clear first.
   * Roads with the highest traffic volumes are plowed or treated first. These roads include interstates and other busy state routes, which receive ongoing operations throughout a storm.
   * Lettered and numbered routes with lower traffic volumes are plowed to allow for two-way traffic, with concentration on hills, curves, and intersections. Traffic on these roads may have more snow on them until the higher-volume roads are mostly clear.
   As soon as possible after a storm ends, our goal is to return highest traveled routes to mostly clear conditions and to plow and treat the critical areas of hills, curves and intersections on all other routes.
   Even after all the driving lanes are mostly clear though, MODOT's work is not done. Workers now must clean up the accumulation of snow on shoulders, bridge edges and at interchanges during normal working hours.
 

MoDOT issues state-wide travel advisory

Sunday, 02 March 2014 16:28 Published in Local News
   JEFFERSON CITY, MO – With weekend snow and freezing rain covering the most of the state, Missouri travelers are advised to use caution if they must travel Sunday evening and Monday morning.
   Snow, sleet and freezing rain is expected to continue statewide, affecting road conditions overnight. Extreme cold temperatures and high wind continues to be a concern, causing blowing and drifting snow.
   "MoDOT crews will work throughout the night to keep roads plowed and treated," said Beth Wright, MoDOT state maintenance engineer. "We encourage people to stay tuned to local weather forecasts, check road conditions on MoDOT's traveler map, and avoid travel if possible."
   Heavier snow is in the forecast for northern and central Missouri with accumulations expected to reach from 3 to 6 inches, and a possibility of 1 to 3 inches in the southern counties of the state. Precipitation is expected to continue through Monday morning.
   If you must travel, take your mobile phone and winter survival supplies. If you become stranded, stay with your vehicle and call 911. Be aware that emergency responders may have difficulty reaching you. 
   Remember the following winter driving tips:
 
   ·       Wear your seat belt.
   ·       Slow down, and adjust your speed to the conditions.
   ·       Give snow plows plenty of room.
   ·       Keep your windshield and windows clear to help you see.
   ·       Be alert and remember that road conditions can change very quickly.
   ·       Allow extra travel time to get to your destination.
 
   Stay informed about Missouri road conditions by using MoDOT's Traveler Information Map, available online at www.modot.org or through the smartphone app. The map offers current views of road conditions for Missouri interstates and highways. You can zoom in to a particular location, check live weather radar and view images from MoDOT's traffic cameras and message boards.
   MoDOT also provides road conditions information through the Customer Service Center. Dial 1-888-ASK-MODOT (1-888-275-6636) to speak to a customer service representative. They are available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.
 

Latest News

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
Prev Next
Man charged in connection to mother's murder

Man charged in connection to mother's murder

St. Louis, MO (KTRS) - A St. Louis man is facing first-degree murder charges in his mother's death.   Prosecutors allege that Courtney Cunningham allegedly shot his...

Missouri lawmakers mull change to helmet law

Missouri lawmakers mull change to helmet law

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - The Missouri House has endorsed a bill that would allow motorcyclists over the age of 21 to forgo wearing helmets while travelling on the road. &n...

House approves change to Missouri primary dates

House approves change to Missouri primary dates

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - The Missouri House gave initial approval to legislation that would move the state's primary elections to June.   Party primaries for Cong...

One dead after shooting in Washington Park, Illinois

WASHINGTON PARK, Ill. (AP) - Illinois State Police are helping investigate a suspected drive-by shooting death of a 19-year-old man in southwestern Illinois' Washington Park. ...

Three gyms robbed within minutes of one another

St. Louis, MO (KTRS) - A spate of break-ins targeted south city gyms this morning.   Fox2 reports thieves hit at least three different gyms in less than a half an h...

UPDATE: Missing Belleville boy found safe

UPDATE: Missing Belleville boy found safe

St. Louis, MO (KTRS) - UPDATE: Good news for a Belleville father, his 11-year-old son has been found safe.   A SARAA Alert was issued Wednesday morning for DeA...

Universities examine bans of 'selfies' at graduations

St. Louis, MO (KTRS) - It may be coming to a college near you.......with graduation season upon us, bans on selfies are being suggested.   Two universities are the ...

© 2013 KTRS All Rights Reserved