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COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — University of Missouri System President Tim Wolfe says he'll recommend that tuition at the system's four campuses not increase for the 2014-15 school year.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Wolfe told the Post-Dispatch editorial board Friday he'd send his recommendation to the Board of Trustees, who would likely take up the matter at a meeting next week.

The last time tuition remained flat was four years ago. The university system's curators had been moving ahead on a plan that would have called for a 1.5 percent tuition increase.

Wolfe's recommendation comes after Gov. Jay Nixon proposed earlier this week to put more than $80 million into higher education. But in exchange, Nixon called on Missouri colleges and universities not to raise costs.

Published in Local News
   Students who've graduated from Missouri high schools, but who can't prove their U.S. citizenship or legal immigration status, will soon pay less to enroll in community college classes in St. Louis.  
   Until now, undocumented students have paid the international student rate of $204 per credit hour at all St. Louis Community College campuses.  
   Starting with the semester that begins in January, their tuition rates will be based on where they live.  Those who live in district will pay $98.00 per credit hour -- cutting their tuition bills in half.   
   At least 18 states around the nation, including Illinois, offer similar benefits as a matter of state law.  Missouri does not.
 
Published in Local News
Friday, 22 November 2013 02:16

UM board weighing 2014 tuition hikes

   Tuition is probably going up at all four University of Missouri campuses next year.  

   The university's Board of Curators met yesterday at the UMSL campus to begin weighing a recommendation that an increase be tied to the nation's inflation rate.  The rate is based on the Consumer Price Index for December and won't be known until next month.  The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that budget projections expect it to be about 1.7 percent.  

   The board could vote on the amount of the increase in January.  

   Some non-resident students will pay even more.  Graduate and undergraduate students the Columbia campus will see a 3 percent hike.  And graduate students at Missouri University of Science and Technology in Rolla will pay 6 percent more next fall.

Published in Local News

   Normandy school officials are eyeing cuts to cover the $15 million in tuition costs for 1,600 students who transferred out of the unaccredited district.  Superintendent Ty McNichols says he's begun identifying teachers and programs that will fall to the budget ax.  

   McNichols told a group of about 40 people gathered a a policy breakfast at the Show-Me Institute Tuesday that he's also working to bolster academics, attendance and the graduation rate in the failing district.  But he says he doesn't expect to make big advances before the next transfer application deadline rolls around in February.  

   Normandy has just two months to pay the first of the tuition bills which arrived last week, or the Missouri education department will withhold funding.

Published in Local News

   The first tuition bill is in for Normandy students who transferred to Francis Howell.  

   Four hundred forty-nine transfer students began classes in Francis Howell schools on August 8th.  The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports the total due now is just over $424,000.  Francis Howell Chief Financial Officer Kevin Supple told the paper the bill was sent Tuesday via email.  

   Normandy officials say the invoice must be processed and approved by the school board, which could take a month or more.  

   Missouri education officials have suggested unaccredited districts pay tuition bills within 10 days.  State officials have also said they will withhold state aid distributions if an unaccredited district falls two months behind in paying transfer tuition.

Published in Local News

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Veterans moving to Missouri after leaving the military could immediately claim in-state tuition for public higher education under a bill passed by the state House.

 

The House voted 152-0 to send the measure to the Senate Thursday.

 

It would allow veterans to immediately claim the discounted tuition rate despite not having lived in the state previously. Typically, students seeking in-state tuition must reside in Missouri for 12 consecutive months before qualifying.

 

The measure is sponsored by Republican Rep. Charlie Davis, of Webb City. It also includes a provision that prevents university instructors from giving exams to National Guard members less than 24 hours after they return from training.

 
Published in Local News

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