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Tuesday, 26 March 2013 00:34

Potosi fire chief injured in tanker crash

Potosi’s fire chief is hospitalized following a rollover accident.

The Missouri Highway Patrol reports that Chief Rick Knight was injured in a crash along Highway 47 Washington County around 4:15 Monday afternoon. Knight's truck rolled over, and he was partially ejected.

Fire department officials say the 51 year old was trapped and had to be pried from the truck.

Chief Knight was taken to St. Anthony's Medical Center in south St. Louis County by ambulance because weather conditions made it unsafe to use a medical helicopter.

His injuries are described as serious, including broken bones.
Published in Local News
An off-duty St. Louis police officer is recovering from a broken leg and a concussion after an overnight car accident.

Police say a car pulled in front of the officer who was driving in his personal car just after midnight at Hampton and Milentz in St. Louis Hills.

The man has been a police officer since 1993.
Published in Local News
OCALA, Fla. (AP) — Police in Ocala, Fla., have cited country singer David Allen Coe for running a red light before crashing into a tractor-trailer early Tuesday.

A message on Coe's website says the 73-year-old is "recuperating from his accident and will be ok."

Coe's agent tells the Ocala Star-Banner that his upcoming concerts in St. Louis and Louisville, Ky., have been canceled.
Published in Local News
Crews haven't finished building it, but there's already been a crash on the New Mississippi River Bridge.

It happened about 2:00 Monday morning, when a pickup truck struck an car on Rte 3 in Brooklyn, Illinois. The truck pushed the car onto the bridge.

One passenger in the car was partially ejected. Both that passenger and the driver were taken to the hospital with serious injuries.

Police are now looking for the pickup driver. He reportedly stuck around long enough to flag down another motorist for help, then took off.
Published in Local News
Monday, 18 March 2013 04:46

Page reopens after accident

Page Avenue is open again in Pagedale after an accident that toppled the traffic lights forced police to shut it down for much of the night.

The crash happened at Page and Pennsylvania about 1 o'clock Monday morning. An SUV struck the light pole, knocking it over and into the street.

There's no word on the cause of that crash, or if there were any injuries.
Published in Local News
Sunday, 17 March 2013 10:07

Man charged for role in fatal crash

ST. LOUIS (AP) -- A St. Louis man faces criminal charges in a crash that killed a 53-year-old man and seriously injured two others.

Forty-one-year-old Robert A. White was charged Friday with first-degree manslaughter, two counts of second-degree assault and three counts of armed criminal action.

Police said White was driving a sport utility vehicle that T-boned another vehicle Thursday. Marcus Dorsey was killed and two passengers were hospitalized.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that White was treated for minor injuries and arrested.

Officials said White had fled the scene of an earlier accident with a St. Louis City License Collector's vehicle. Police said the driver of the city vehicle called 911 and followed the SUV.

The second crash was one or two miles away from the first.
Published in Local News
TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — Another Carnival cruise ship is having problems. The Carnival Legend has canceled a stop in Grand Cayman and is headed back to the Port of Tampa after the company says a "technical issue" began affecting the ship's sailing speed.

Passengers on the Carnival Dream are being flown home because of problems with an on-board generator while docked in St. Maarten. And last month the Carnival Triumph spent five days in the in the Gulf of Mexico without power or working toilets.
Published in National News
Emergency crews have cleared a two vehicle accident on westbound Interstate 44 near Six Flags. The crash happened just before 5 a.m.

All lanes have now reopened along westbound I-44 just past the Allenton/Six Flags exit. The intestate had been closed completely earlier this morning.

Traffic should return to normal quickly.

There's also no word on any injuries or what may have caused the accident.
Published in Local News
Sunday, 24 February 2013 08:00

One dead after wrong-way crash on I-55

ST. LOUIS (AP) -- A wrong-way crash on U.S. 55 in eastern Missouri has left one man dead and another man injured.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the accident occurred early Saturday when a car headed south in the northbound lanes collided with another car.

The car that headed in the wrong direction caught fire, and the driver was pronounced dead at the scene. The 36-year-old driver of the other car was taken to an area hospital, where he was listed in serious but stable condition.
Published in Local News
YAKIMA, Wash. (AP) -- Federal and state officials say six underground tanks holding a brew of radioactive and toxic waste are leaking at the country's most contaminated nuclear site in south-central Washington, raising concerns about delays for emptying the aging tanks. The leaking materials at Hanford Nuclear Reservation pose no immediate risk to public safety or the environment because it would take perhaps years for the chemicals to reach groundwater, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee said Friday. But the news has renewed discussion over delays for emptying the tanks, which were installed decades ago and are long past their intended 20-year life span. "None of these tanks would be acceptable for use today. They are all beyond their design life. None of them should be in service," said Tom Carpenter of Hanford Challenge, a Hanford watchdog group. "And yet, they're holding two-thirds of the nation's high-level nuclear waste." Just last week, state officials announced that one of Hanford's 177 tanks was leaking 150 to 300 gallons a year, posing a risk to groundwater and rivers. So far, nearby monitoring wells haven't detected higher radioactivity levels. Inslee then traveled to Washington, D.C., to discuss the problem with federal officials, learning in meetings Friday that six tanks are leaking. The declining waste levels in the six tanks were missed because only a narrow band of measurements was evaluated, rather than a wider band that would have shown the levels changing over time, Inslee said. "It's like if you're trying to determine if climate change is happening, only looking at the data for today," he said. "Perhaps human error, the protocol did not call for it. But that's not the most important thing at the moment. The important thing now is to find and address the leakers." Department of Energy spokeswoman Lindsey Geisler said there was no immediate health risk and that federal officials would work with Washington state to address the matter. Regardless, Sen. Ron Wyden, the new chairman of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, will ask the Government Accountability Office to investigate Hanford's tank monitoring and maintenance program, said his spokesman, Tom Towslee. The federal government built the Hanford facility at the height of World War II as part of the Manhattan Project to build the atomic bomb. The remote site produced plutonium for the bomb dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, and continued supporting the nation's nuclear weapons arsenal for years. Today, it is the most contaminated nuclear site in the country, still surrounded by sagebrush but with Washington's Tri-Cities of Richland, Kennewick and Pasco several miles downriver. Several years ago, workers at Hanford completed two of three projects deemed urgent risks to the public and the environment, removing all weapons-grade plutonium from the site and emptying leaky pools that held spent nuclear fuel just 400 yards from the river. But successes at the site often are overshadowed by delays, budget overruns and technological challenges. Nowhere have those challenges been more apparent than in Hanford's central plateau, home to the site's third most urgent project: emptying the tanks. Hanford's tanks hold some 53 million gallons of highly radioactive waste - enough to fill dozens of Olympic-size swimming pools - and many of those tanks are known to have leaked in the past. An estimated 1 million gallons of radioactive liquid has already leaked there. The cornerstone of emptying the tanks is a treatment plant that will convert the waste into glasslike logs for safe, secure storage. The plant, last estimated to cost more than $12.3 billion, is billions of dollars over budget and behind schedule. It isn't expected to being operating until at least 2019. Washington state is imposing a "zero-tolerance" policy on radioactive waste leaking into the soil, Inslee said. So given those delays and the apparent deterioration of some of the tanks, the federal government will have to show that there is adequate storage for the waste in the meantime, he said. "We are not convinced of this," he said. "There will be a robust exchange of information in the coming weeks to get to the bottom of this." Inslee and Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber, both Democrats, have championed building additional tanks to ensure safe storage of the waste until the plant is completed. Wyden, D-Ore., toured the site earlier this week. He said he shares the governors' concerns about the integrity of the tanks but he wants more scientific information to determine it's the correct way to spend scarce money. Wyden noted the nation's most contaminated nuclear site - and the challenges associated with ridding it of its toxic legacy - will be a subject of upcoming hearings and a higher priority in Washington, D.C. The federal government already spends $2 billion each year on Hanford cleanup - one-third of its entire budget for nuclear cleanup nationally. The Energy Department has said it expects funding levels to remain the same for the foreseeable future, but a new Energy Department report released this week calls for annual budgets of as much as $3.5 billion during some years of the cleanup effort. There are legal, moral and ethical considerations to cleaning up the Hanford site at the national level, Inslee said, adding that he will continue to insist that the Energy Department completely clean up the site.
Published in National News
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