Click for St. Louis, Missouri Forecast

// a href = ./ // St Louis News, Weather, Sports, The Big 550 AM, St Louis Traffic, Breaking News in St Louis

 
 
 
Wednesday, 29 January 2014 02:18

Questions and answer about Obama's wage plan

WASHINGTON (AP) — Relatively few Americans — less than 5 percent of hourly workers — toil for the minimum wage today.
 
Yet President Barack Obama's push to offset years of inflation by raising the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour would ripple through the economy and touch the lives of millions more workers and their families.
 
Here are some questions and answers about Obama's proposal:
 
___
 
Q: How much is the U.S. minimum wage now?
 
A: It's $7.25 an hour, or about $15,000 per year for full-time work. For a worker supporting a family of two, that falls just below the federal poverty line.
 
A minimum wage of $10.10 would mean earning about $21,000 per year.
 
___
 
Q: How many Americans work for minimum wage?
 
A: About 1.6 million, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. They are a smaller share of the workforce than in previous decades.
 
Another 2 million people are paid even less, because of various exceptions in the law. Many are waiters, bellhops and others whose wages are augmented by tips from customers. Their minimum is lower — $2.13 an hour — and hasn't gone up for more than two decades. Obama supports boosting the minimum for tipped workers to $7.07.
 
Together, both groups make up 4.7 percent of workers paid by the hour, and even less of the workforce when salaried workers are included.
 
___
 
Q: Are these the only workers who would get a boost from Obama's plan?
 
A: No. Millions more people who earn less than $10.10 an hour would get an automatic raise. Many of them work in states that have imposed a minimum wage that's higher than the current federal one.
 
And some people who already make more than $10.10 would get raises, too, as businesses adjusted their pay scales upward.
 
Democratic lawmakers pushing for the increase predict it would lead to raises for some 30 million people. Republican opponents counter that it could force companies to reduce hiring or even lay off some workers.
 
___
 
Q: How many states have a minimum wage higher than the federal one?
 
A: Twenty-one states, plus the District of Columbia, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.
 
None is as high as the wage Obama seeks. Washington state's is highest at $9.32 an hour, adjusted annually for inflation. California's minimum wage is set to climb to $10 in 2016.
 
State lawmakers aren't waiting for a divided Congress to act. Democratic legislators are pushing minimum-wage increases in more than half of the states this year, although several are political longshots.
 
___
 
Q: Who makes minimum wage?
 
A: Most are workers in part-time jobs. They tend to be in the service industry, especially in restaurant and sales jobs.
 
Most are adults. But teens and young people make up a disproportionately large share: half of minimum-wage workers are under age 25.
 
Nearly three-quarters have a high school degree or more education. More than three-quarters are white.
 
Nearly 2 out of 3 are female.
 
___
 
Q: Where did the minimum wage come from?
 
A: It started at 25 cents per hour in the 1938 Fair Labor Standards Act. Since then, Congress has raised it 22 times. Its value peaked in the 1960s, but the wage hasn't kept up with inflation since then.
 
The last increase was in 2007, during the presidency of George W. Bush. It was phased in to reach $7.25 in 2009.
 
Obama wants the wage to be indexed to inflation, so it would rise automatically in the future.
 
___
 
Q: Why not raise the minimum wage?
 
Q: Many congressional Republicans and other opponents say that would dampen hiring or even spark layoffs at a time when the nation is struggling with high unemployment. They argue that much of the cost would be passed along to consumers as higher prices. And they say it isn't an efficient way to help the poor, because many people earning the minimum wage are part of a middle-class or higher-earning households.
 
___
 
Q: So what do Obama and Democratic supporters say?
 
A: They say that raising the minimum wage would boost the economy and create jobs, because cash-strapped workers tend to spend any extra money that comes in. Supporters argue that boosting low wages would help narrow the gap between the nation's poorest and richest families. And they say full-time workers with families shouldn't have to live in poverty.
Published in National News
Tuesday, 26 November 2013 02:50

Obama pushes back against critics of Iran deal

   WASHINGTON (AP) — Pushing back hard, President Barack Obama forcefully defended the temporary agreement to freeze Iran's disputed nuclear program on Monday, declaring that the United States "cannot close the door on diplomacy."

   The president's remarks followed skepticism of the historic accord expressed by some U.S. allies abroad as well as by members of Congress at home, including fellow Democrats. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, one of the fiercest opponents of the six-month deal, called it a "historic mistake" and announced he would be dispatching a top envoy to Washington to try to toughen the final agreement negotiators will soon begin hammering out.

   Obama, without naming names, swiped at those who have questioned the wisdom of engaging with Iran.

   "Tough talk and bluster may be the easy thing to do politically, but it's not the right thing to do for our security," he said during an event in San Francisco.

   The weekend agreement between Iran and six world powers — the U.S., Britain, France, Russia, China and Germany — is to temporarily halt parts of Tehran's disputed nuclear program and allow for more intrusive international monitoring. In exchange, Iran gains some modest relief from stiff economic sanctions and a pledge from Obama that no new penalties will be levied during the six months.

   Despite the fanfare surrounding the agreement, administration officials say key technical details on the inspections and sanctions relief must still be worked out before it formally takes effect. Those talks will tackle the toughest issues that have long divided Iran and the West, including whether Tehran will be allowed to enrich uranium at a low level.

   Iran insists it has a right to enrich uranium for peaceful purposes, and many nuclear analysts say a final deal will almost certainly leave Iran with some right to enrich. However, that's sure to spark more discord with Israel and many lawmakers who insist Tehran be stripped of all enrichment capabilities. British Foreign Secretary William Hague said he expects the deal to be fully implemented by the end of January.

   European Union officials say their sanctions could be eased as soon as December. Those restrictions affect numerous areas including trade in petrochemicals, gold and other precious metals, financial transfers to purchase food and medicine, and the ability of third countries to use EU-based firms to insure shipments of Iranian oil again.

   The groundwork for the accord was laid during four clandestine meetings between U.S. and Iranian officials throughout the summer and fall. An earlier meeting took place in March, before Iranians elected President Hassan Rouhani, a cleric who has taken more moderate public stances than his predecessor. Details of the secret talks were confirmed to The Associated Press by three senior administration officials.

   The U.S. and its allies contend Iran is seeking to produce a nuclear bomb — of particular concern to Israel, which fears an attack — while Tehran insists it is merely pursuing a peaceful nuclear program for energy and medical purposes.

   Even with the criticism, for Obama the sudden shift to foreign policy presents an opportunity to steady his flailing second term and take some attention off the domestic troubles that have plagued the White House in recent weeks, especially the rollout of his signature health care law. Perhaps with his presidential standing — and the strength of the rest of his term — in mind, he made sure on Monday to draw a connection between the nuclear pact and his long-declared willingness to negotiate directly with Iran.

   "When I first ran for president, I said it was time for a new era of American leadership in the world, one that turned the page on a decade of war and began a new era of engagement with the world," he said. "As president and as commander in chief, I've done what I've said."

   Later, at a high-dollar fundraiser in Los Angeles, Obama said he will not take any options off the table to ensure Iran does not develop a nuclear weapon.

   However, he added, "I've spent too much time at Walter Reed looking at kids 22, 23, 24, 25 years old who've paid the kind of price that very few of us in this room can imagine on behalf of our freedom not to say that I will do every single thing that I can to try to resolve these issues without resorting to military conflict."

   The temporary accord is historic in its own right, marking the most substantial agreement between Iran and the West in more than three decades. The consequences of a permanent deal could be far more significant, lowering the prospects of a nuclear arms race in the volatile Middle East and perhaps opening the door to wider relations between the U.S. and Iran, which broke off diplomatic ties following the 1979 Islamic revolution.

   However, Obama and his advisers know the nuclear negotiations are rife with risk. If he has miscalculated Iran's intentions, it will vindicate critics who say his willingness to negotiate with Tehran is naive and could inadvertently hasten the Islamic republic's march toward a nuclear weapon. Obama also runs the risk of exacerbating tensions with key Middle Eastern allies, as well as members of Congress who want to deepen, not ease, economic penalties on Iran.

   Despite Obama's assurances that no new sanctions will be levied on Iran while the interim agreement is in effect, some lawmakers want to push ahead with additional penalties. A new sanctions bill has already passed the House, and if it passes the Senate, Obama could have to wield his veto power in order to keep his promise to Tehran.

   Even some members of Obama's own party say they're wary of the deal struck in Geneva.

   "I am disappointed by the terms of the agreement between Iran and the P5+1 nations because it does not seem proportional," said Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., a close ally of the White House. "Iran simply freezes its nuclear capabilities while we reduce the sanctions."

   The Senate's Democratic majority leader, Harry Reid, was noncommittal on the subject of sanctions on Monday. On NPR's Diane Rehm Show, he said that when lawmakers return from their Thanksgiving break, "we will take a look at this to see if we need stronger sanctions ... and if we need work on this, if we need stronger sanctions I am sure we will do that."

   Some lawmakers are also concerned about concessions the world powers made to Iran on its planned heavy water reactor in Arak, southwest of Tehran. Two congressional aides said that under the terms of the agreement, international monitors will not being able to watch live feeds of any activity at Arak and will instead retrieve a recording from the preceding day during each daily inspection.

   The aides were not authorized to provide details of the agreement and demanded anonymity.

   On the positive side, Michael Desch, a political science professor at the University of Notre Dame, compared Obama's diplomatic overtures to Secretary of State Henry Kissinger's secret outreach to China in the 1970s, which paved the way for the historic opening of U.S. relations with the Asian nation.

   "Then, as now, critics complained that the U.S. was in danger of being hoodwinked by a radical and violent regime that was playing us for a sucker," Desch said. "An opening to Iran could potentially not only contain its nuclear program but set the stage for broader changes there as well."

Published in National News

   WASHINGTON, Ill. (AP) - Gov. Pat Quinn says he's received a phone call from President Barack Obama after fatal storms hit Obama's home state.

   Quinn spokeswoman Brooke Anderson said Monday that Quinn received the call on his cellphone while touring damage in the central Illinois community of Washington.  The community was among the hardest hit. The White House confirmed the call, saying Obama relayed concern and expressed gratitude for the responders.

   Quinn gave Obama an update on the damage, relief efforts and emergency response. Quinn was with Washington Mayor Gary Manier, who also spoke to Obama.

   Authorities say six people died in Sunday's storms when tornadoes flattened homes and caused severe damage. So far seven counties have been declared state disaster areas.

Published in Local News

   WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama has signed a measure into law reopening the federal government and averting a potential default.

   The White House says Obama signed the bill early Thursday, hours after the House gave final approval.

   The White House budget office has already instructed federal workers to plan to return to work Thursday morning.

   The measure restores funding for the government through Jan. 15 and extends the nation's borrowing authority through Feb. 7.

   The partial government shutdown started Oct. 1. The U.S. was to reach its debt limit Thursday if no deal was reached.

   As the deal neared final passage in the House Wednesday, Obama said it was now time for leaders in Washington to win back the trust of Americans that was lost during the debt-and-spending crisis.

Published in National News
Wednesday, 28 August 2013 09:45

Boonville Schools stick by Superintendent

The Boonville School District is standing by its superintendent following an investigation into the rodeo clown incident. The investigation by the district clears Dr. Mark Ficken of any wrongdoing stemming from the incident at the Missouri State Fair earlier this month. The report, prepared by a former Missouri Public Schools Superintendent and a former Missouri Attorney General, says Dr. Ficken was incorrectly credited as the man making disparaging remarks about President Obama, when in fact, they say, it was a rodeo clown. 

Published in Local News

WASHINGTON (AP) — Six months ago, President Barack Obama stood on the steps of the United States Capitol and offered a soaring liberal vision for his second term.

But the intervening months have showcased the political limits of Obama's ambitions. The result has been an uneven and sometimes disjointed start to what could arguably be the most important year of his second term.

Legislative victories have been scarce.

The president's gun control measures were vanquished on Capitol Hill, prospects for a grand deficit reduction deal are slim, and an immigration overhaul faces an uncertain future. Domestic troubles and foreign policy crises have also thrown the White House off course and into a defensive crouch.

The president's top advisers insist they came into the year clear-eyed about the potential pitfalls, particularly on Capitol Hill.

Published in National News

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama is urging Americans to "make some choices" in balancing privacy and security.

Obama is defending once-secret surveillance programs that sweep up an estimated 3 billion phone calls a day and amass Internet data from U.S. providers in an attempt to thwart terror attacks.

The president says it will be harder to detect threats against the U.S. now that the two top-secret tools to target terrorists have been so thoroughly publicized.

The National Security Agency has been collecting the phone records of hundreds of millions of Americans each day to learn whether terror suspects have been in contact with people in the U.S.

The NSA also has been gathering all Internet usage from major U.S. Internet providers in hopes of detecting suspicious behavior that begins overseas.

NSA-PHONE RECORDS-WORLD REAX

Published in National News

RANCHO MIRAGE, Calif. (AP) — Another two hours of talks are scheduled today in California between President Barack Obama and Chinese leader Xi Jinping.

They'll wrap up their talks with a range of issues. Obama and Xi met for several hours yesterday evening discussing cyber-espionage and other issues.

Obama says the U.S. and China are in "uncharted waters" as they tackle the contentious issue of cybersecurity.

The two leaders carefully avoided directly accusing each other of spying. But they acknowledged an urgent need to find a common approach to addressing the matter.

U.S. officials cast the more relaxed summit at a California estate as an opportunity for Obama and Xi to hold candid and free-flowing talks on the issues that define the relationship between the two countries, including the economy, climate change and North Korea's nuclear provocations.

Published in National News

Latest News

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
Prev Next
House approves change to Missouri primary dates

House approves change to Missouri primary dates

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - The Missouri House gave initial approval to legislation that would move the state's primary elections to June.   Party primaries for Cong...

One dead after shooting in Washington Park, Illinois

WASHINGTON PARK, Ill. (AP) - Illinois State Police are helping investigate a suspected drive-by shooting death of a 19-year-old man in southwestern Illinois' Washington Park. ...

Three gyms robbed within minutes of one another

St. Louis, MO (KTRS) - A spate of break-ins targeted south city gyms this morning.   Fox2 reports thieves hit at least three different gyms in less than a half an h...

UPDATE: Missing Belleville boy found safe

UPDATE: Missing Belleville boy found safe

St. Louis, MO (KTRS) - UPDATE: Good news for a Belleville father, his 11-year-old son has been found safe.   A SARAA Alert was issued Wednesday morning for DeA...

Universities examine bans of 'selfies' at graduations

St. Louis, MO (KTRS) - It may be coming to a college near you.......with graduation season upon us, bans on selfies are being suggested.   Two universities are the ...

© 2013 KTRS All Rights Reserved