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JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services reports that only 751 Missouri residents selected a health insurance plan through a federally run online marketplace during the first month of its troubled launch.

HHS released the figures Wednesday. The department said the insurance exchange had about 14,100 completed applications from Missouri from Oct. 1 to Nov. 2. Those applications sought coverage for about 28,000 people.

The federal government did not say how many of the people selecting a health plan had started paying premiums.

Nationally, HHS says fewer than 27,000 people signed up for health insurance through the federal exchange.

The federal health care overhaul set up online marketplaces to help people find affordable insurance, but the rollout of the HHS website has been rocky from the start.

Published in Local News

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (AP) - An endowment for memorial scholarship at Ozarks Technical Community College has reached $10,000 in honor of a Missouri soldier who died in Afghanistan.

Dennis and Debbie Peters of Springfield pledged a $7,500 gift to endow the Special Agent Sgt. Joseph M. Peters Memorial Scholarship Monday during a Veterans Day ceremony at the college. The gift, along with earlier contributions, brings the total endowment to $10,000.

Sgt. Peters, an OTC graduate, died Oct. 6 in Afghanistan. The scholarship will go to eligible veterans attending the community college in Springfield.

Peters was posthumously awarded the Combat Action Badge, Bronze Star Medal and Purple Heart.

Dennis Peters is the community college's Veterans Student Services representative.

Published in Local News

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — The Missouri Supreme Court is imposing a new fee on attorneys to help provide legal aid to low-income residents in civil court cases.

The court said Friday that it had approved an additional $30 annual fee to be paid by lawyers starting in 2014. The fee is expected to generate at least $750,000.

Missouri's legal services fund helps pay for attorneys to aid people in civil cases such as child-custody disputes, protective orders, home foreclosures and bankruptcy cases.

The Supreme Court says the fee increase will help offset a recent cut in federal funding for low-income legal services.

Missouri's four regional legal aid programs also receive funding from a state fee charged on the filing of civil and criminal court cases.

Published in Local News
Saturday, 09 November 2013 09:18

Ballot proposal seeks cap on Mo. tax credits

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — A coalition backing a Missouri income tax cut has put forward a potential ballot initiative limiting state tax credits.

Grow Missouri says it filed two initiatives Friday with the secretary of state's office that would amend the Missouri Constitution to curb tax credits.

One plan would impose a $200 million annual cap on tax credits; the other would ban all new tax credits upon voter approval of the amendment on the November 2014 ballot. If the state nonetheless exceeds the tax credit caps, the proposals would trigger an automatic reduction in the state's income tax rate.

The treasurer for Grow Missouri says the group plans to file additional ballot initiatives in the coming weeks that would reduce Missouri's income tax rates for businesses and individuals.

Published in Local News
Saturday, 09 November 2013 09:15

New execution date set for Missouri inmate

ST. LOUIS (AP) — The execution of convicted killer Allen Nicklasson, postponed in the debate over Missouri's choice of execution drug, has been rescheduled for December 11th.

The Missouri Supreme Court set the new date on Friday.

Nicklasson was convicted of the 1994 killing of Excelsior Springs, Missouri businessman Richard Drummond, who stopped to help when a car used by Nicklasson and two others broke down on Interstate 70. Another man in the car, Dennis Skillicorn, was executed in 2009.

Nicklasson was first set to be executed Oct. 23, when Missouri planned to use the anesthetic propofol for the first time. The plan drew concerns because most propofol is made in Europe, and the European Union threatened to limit export if it was used in an execution.

Governor Jay Nixon stopped the execution.

Published in Local News

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri's fourth- and eighth-graders are doing about the same on math and reading tests as they were two years ago and about average when compared with the rest of the country.

That's according to the 2013 Nation's Report Card, which was released Thursday. The results come from the National Assessment of Educational Progress, or NAEP, which is given to a sample of students.

Among fourth-graders, 39 percent scored at or above the NAEP proficient level in reading and 35 percent in math. The percentages were similar among eighth-graders, with 36 percent scoring at or above proficient in reading and 35 percent scoring at or above the proficient level in reading.

Missouri education commissioner Chris Nicastro says the state still has "work to do."

 

Published in Local News

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Gov. Jay Nixon says the state will help finance the estimated $2 million needed to remove mold and make repairs at the historic Missouri State Penitentiary in Jefferson City.

The prison has become a major attraction since it stopped housing inmates in 2004, but high levels of mold forced officials to close it to the public in October. Officials say it had been on pace for more than 20,000 visitors this year.

Nixon said Wednesday the state and the Jefferson City government will share the costs evenly, with a goal of resuming public tours next spring. Three buildings and the gas chamber will be repaired.

The penitentiary began housing inmates in 1836 and was the oldest continually operating prison west of the Mississippi River when it closed.

Published in Local News

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - The chairman of a special Missouri House panel is outlining potential Medicaid changes that could expand coverage to lower-income adults while reducing it for children.

Jefferson City Republican Rep. Jay Barnes offered a detailed financial estimate Wednesday showing the potential changes could save about $42 million in revenues by the time the changes are fully implemented in 2021.

That figure assumes Missouri would spend more money to add adults living in poverty to its Medicaid rolls and subsidize private insurance policies through a federal online marketplace for adults earning slightly more than the poverty level.

It assumes savings to the state by eliminating Medicaid coverage for some children and blind adults. Barnes says they could get policies through the federally run health insurance exchange.

Published in Local News

FORISTELL, Mo. (AP) - An eastern Missouri man has been sentenced to seven years in prison for attacking his 11-year-old son with a baseball bat.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the sentence for 46-year-old Mark Alan Calloni of Foristell follows his plea of no contest to child abuse charges filed in July.

Police say Calloni struck the child several times for unknown reasons, using a wooden baseball bat. He then tackled the boy and pinned him to the ground. The child broke free and ran to a neighbor's house, where he called police.

The boy did not suffer any serious injuries.

In 2005, Calloni pleaded guilty to domestic assault, endangering the welfare of a child and felonious restraint. He was sentenced to five years of probation in that case.

 

Published in Local News

   A federal appeals court has temporarily halted plans to resume domestic horse slaughter.  The 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver Monday issued a temporary injunction barring the Department of Agriculture from inspecting the plants.  

   Slaughterhouses in Missouri and New Mexico had hoped to start up as soon as this week after a federal judge in Albuquerque on Friday threw out a lawsuit by The Humane Society of the United States and other animal protection groups.  

   The groups filed an immediate appeal and won the emergency injunction.

   The order continues the on-again, off-again plans to resume domestic horse slaughter six years after  Congress cut funding for inspectors, forcing the last big slaughterhouses to close.

Published in Local News

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