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South County Man Charged With Rape, Sodomy and Torture

Wednesday, 16 April 2014 07:09 Published in Local News
ST. LOUIS (AP) - A St. Louis-area man is accused of sexually torturing five women in his apartment over several years.
 
Authorities on Tuesday announced that 29-year-old Adam Michael Capriglione of south St. Louis County is facing 19 felony charges that include forcible rape, forcible sodomy, felonious restraint and domestic assault.
Capriglione is jailed on $500,000 bond.
 
Police spokesman Brian Schellman says an investigation began after one of the victims contacted police in January. Capriglione is accused of raping, sodomizing and torturing five women dating back to 2006.
Capriglione also faces one count of sexual exploitation of a minor for allegedly filming a child having sex in 2007.
 A phone message left with Capriglione's attorney, Joseph Green, was not immediately returned.
 
The crimes occurred at Capriglione's apartment and allegedly involved five victims. According to court records, most of the victims began as girlfriends. Some lived with Capriglione. One woman was allegedly choked until she fell unconscious. That same victim was allegedly burned with heated scissors, cut, and beaten with a rubber mallet.
 
Police suspect there may be other victims and urge them to come forward.
 
CLAYTON, Mo. (AP) - St. Louis County police and the Drug Enforcement Administration are asking residents of the county to turn in unused prescription drugs.
 
The drug take-back initiative is scheduled for 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. April 26. Police say it is part of an effort to ensure that unused medications don't become available for abuse, and are kept out of the water supply. The DEA will dispose of all drugs collected.
 
Police say the effort is free and anonymous. Four collection sites will be offered at locations in north St. Louis County, Mehlville, Fenton and Wildwood.
 

STUDY FINDS SIGNS OF BRAIN CHANGES IN POT SMOKERS

Wednesday, 16 April 2014 06:54 Published in Health & Fitness

NEW YORK (AP) -- A small study of casual marijuana smokers has turned up evidence of changes in the brain, a possible sign of trouble ahead, researchers say.

The young adults who volunteered for the study were not dependent on pot, nor did they show any marijuana-related problems.

"What we think we are seeing here is a very early indication of what becomes a problem later on with prolonged use," things like lack of focus and impaired judgment, said Dr. Hans Breiter, a study author.

Longer-term studies will be needed to see if such brain changes cause any symptoms over time, said Breiter, of the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and Massachusetts General Hospital.

Previous studies have shown mixed results in looking for brain changes from marijuana use, perhaps because of differences in the techniques used, he and others noted in Wednesday's issue of the Journal of Neurosciences.

The study is among the first to focus on possible brain effects in recreational pot smokers, said Dr. Nora Volkow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse. The federal agency helped pay for the work. She called the work important but preliminary.

The 20 pot users in the study, ages 18 to 25, said they smoked marijuana an average of about four days a week, for an average total of about 11 joints. Half of them smoked fewer than six joints a week. Researchers scanned their brains and compared the results to those of 20 non-users who were matched for age, sex and other traits.

The results showed differences in two brain areas associated with emotion and motivation - the amygdala and the nucleus accumbens. Users showed higher density than non-users, as well as differences in shape of those areas. Both differences were more pronounced in those who reported smoking more marijuana.

Volkow said larger studies are needed to explore whether casual to moderate marijuana use really does cause anatomical brain changes, and if so, whether that leads to any impairment.

The current work doesn't determine whether casual to moderate marijuana use is harmful to the brain, she said.

Murat Yucel of Monash University in Australia, who has studied the brains of marijuana users but didn't participate in the new study, said in an email that the new results suggest "the effects of marijuana can occur much earlier than previously thought." Some of the effect may depend on a person's age when marijuana use starts, he said.

Another brain researcher, Krista Lisdahl of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, said her own work has found similar results. "I think the clear message is we see brain alterations before you develop dependence," she said.

---

AP Medical Writer Lindsey Tanner in Chicago contributed to this report.

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Online:

Journal: HTTP://WWW.JNEUROSCI.ORG

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