Click for St. Louis, Missouri Forecast

// a href = ./ // St Louis News, Weather, Sports, The Big 550 AM, St Louis Traffic, Breaking News in St Louis

Online pharmacy:fesmag.com/tem

Have you a sex problem? Please visit our site:fesmag.com/medic

Site map
 
 
 
KTRS News

KTRS News

FORT HOOD GUNMAN HAD 'UNSTABLE' MENTAL CONDITION

Friday, 04 April 2014 08:46 Published in National News

FORT HOOD, Texas (AP) — Unstable mental health may be a "fundamental, underlying cause" of a soldier's shooting rampage at Fort Hood that left four people dead, though an argument with another service member likely preceded the attack, according to investigators.

Spc. Ivan Lopez turned his gun on himself after killing three people and wounding 16 others Wednesday at the sprawling Texas military base, where more than a dozen people were fatally shot by a soldier in 2009. An Army truck driver from Puerto Rico, Lopez was undergoing treatment for depression and anxiety while being evaluated for post-traumatic stress disorder, base officials said.

Lt. Gen. Mark Milley, senior officer at the nation's largest Army base, said there was a "strong indication" that Lopez was involved in a verbal altercation shortly before the shooting, though it doesn't appear he targeted specific soldiers during the attack. But investigators also are focusing on his mental health.

"We have very strong evidence that he had a medical history that indicates unstable psychiatric or psychological condition," Milley said. "We believe that to be a fundamental, underlying cause."

Lopez had reported to medical personnel that he'd suffered a traumatic brain injury. The 34-year-old served four months in Iraq but saw no combat, and he previously had demonstrated no apparent risk of violence.

He seemed to have a clean record that showed no ties to potential terrorists, though military officials said the investigation was ongoing.

"We're not making any assumptions by that. We're going to keep an open mind and an open investigation," Army Secretary John McHugh said Thursday in Washington, explaining that "possible extremist involvement is still being looked at very, very carefully."

Three of the wounded in Wednesday's shooting remained in serious condition at Scott & White Memorial Hospital in nearby Temple on Friday. One other person was in good condition. Hospital officials had no information about patients being treated elsewhere, including at a base hospital. But because Scott & White is the area's only trauma center, the patients with the most serious injuries were probably taken there.

Investigators searched Lopez's home on Thursday and questioned his wife, who declined to comment in Spanish when reached by phone by The Associated Press.

Lopez walked into a base building around 4 p.m. Wednesday and began firing a .45-caliber semi-automatic pistol. He then got into a vehicle and continued shooting before entering another building on the Army post. He eventually was confronted by military police in a parking lot, Milley said.

As he came within 20 feet of a police officer, the gunman put his hands up but then reached under his jacket and pulled out his gun. The officer drew her own weapon, and the suspect put his gun to his head and pulled the trigger a final time, Milley said.

The base's commander praised the actions of the female police officer but declined to release her name. Milley also said authorities were first alerted to the rampage when two soldiers who had been shot managed to dial 911, and that a base chaplain shielded soldiers with his own body before smashing window glass to allow them to flee the area.

Lopez bought the weapon he used in the attack at Guns Galore in Killeen — the same store, just off the base, where Army psychiatrist Nidal Hasan purchased an FN 5-7 tactical pistol that he used it to kill 13 people and wound more than 30 others in a November 2009 shooting on the base.

After that shooting, which marked the deadliest attack on a domestic military installation in U.S. history, the military tightened base security nationwide.

Lopez grew up in Guayanilla, a town of fewer than 10,000 people on the southwestern coast of Puerto Rico, with a mother who was a nurse at a public clinic and a father who did maintenance for an electric utility company.

Glidden Lopez Torres, who said he was a friend speaking for the family, said Lopez's mother died of a heart attack in November.

The soldier was upset that he was granted only a 24-hour leave to attend her funeral, which was delayed for nearly a week so he could be there, the spokesman said. The leave was then extended to two days.

Lopez joined the island's National Guard in 1999, and he served on a yearlong peacekeeping mission in Egypt's Sinai Peninsula in the mid-2000s. He enlisted with the Army in 2008, and arrived at Fort Hood in February from Fort Bliss, a Texas post near the Mexico border.

He saw a psychiatrist last month and showed no "sign of any likely violence either to himself or others," McHugh said.

Suzie Miller, a 71-year-old retired property manager who lived in the same Killeen apartment complex as Lopez, said few people knew him and his wife well because they had just moved in a few weeks ago.

"I'd see him in his uniform heading out to the car every morning," Miller said. "He was friendly to me and a lot of us around here."

___

Associated Press writers Ramit Plushnick-Masti in Houston; Christopher Sherman in McAllen; Robert Burns, Eric Tucker and Alicia Caldwell in Washington; and Dánica Coto in Guayanilla, Puerto Rico, contributed to this report.

Police ID Victims, Seek Shooter

Friday, 04 April 2014 08:03 Published in Local News
ST. LOUIS (AP) - St. Louis police have identified two people killed in a shooting on the city's north side.
 
The shooting happened Wednesday afternoon, near Langston Middle School. The victims are identified as 35-year-old Michael Hennings and 27-year-old Ashley Townsend. Both were shot while inside a parked car and were pronounced dead at the scene.
 
Witnesses told police that the shooter gout out of a car and opened fire. Police are looking for the gunman.

Alton "Pill Mill" Doctor Sentenced

Friday, 04 April 2014 07:59 Published in Local News
EAST ST. LOUIS, Ill. (AP) - A southwestern Illinois doctor has been sentenced to a year and a day in federal prison for defrauding the state's Medicaid program and illegally dispensing prescription medications.
 
Sixty-nine-year-old Viwathna Bhuthimethee of Alton also was fined $5,000 on Thursday in East St. Louis and ordered to spend two years on post-prison supervised release.
Bhuthimethee pleaded guilty in February to one count of health care fraud and 14 counts of illegal distribution of a controlled substance.
 
Authorities say Bhuthimethee ran an Alton walk-in clinic with his wife. He was indicted in 2012.
 
Investigators accused him of operating a "pill mill" in which he prescribed more than 2,000 painkiller or anti-anxiety pills to four women from 2008 through 2010 outside the course of his professional practice.
   
 

Latest News

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
Prev Next

NEW WHOOPING COUGH STRAIN IN US RAISES QUESTIONS

NEW YORK (AP) -- Researchers have discovered the first U.S. cases of whooping cough caused by a germ that may be resistant to the vaccine. Health officials are looking into whet...

NPS HANTAVIRUS RESPONSE FOLLOWED POLICY

YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK, Calif. (AP) -- Federal investigators probing the hantavirus outbreak blamed for three deaths at Yosemite National Park recommended on Monday that design cha...

SOME SIGNS POLICE LOOK FOR IN PSYCHIATRIC CRISES

SOME SIGNS POLICE LOOK FOR IN PSYCHIATRIC CRISES

Police officers who receive crisis intervention training are taught how to recognize when someone with serious mental illness might be having a psychiatric crisis. Considering t...

Bashful? Buy the little blue pill online

Bashful? Buy the little blue pill online

   TRENTON, N.J. (AP) - Men who are bashful about needing help in the bedroom no longer have to visit a drugstore to buy that little blue pill.    In a first for the drug industry...

CLUES TO WHY MOST SURVIVED CHINA MELAMINE SCANDAL

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Scientists wondering why some children and not others survived one of China's worst food safety scandals have uncovered a suspect: germs that live in the gut. ...

First lady's anti-obesity campaign is prompting change

First lady's anti-obesity campaign is prompting change

WASHINGTON (AP) - Walmart is putting special labels on some store-brand products to help shoppers quickly spot healthier items. Millions of schoolchildren are helping themselves to...

GROUPS RACE TO HIRE, TRAIN 'OBAMACARE' GUIDES

GROUPS RACE TO HIRE, TRAIN 'OBAMACARE' GUIDES

CHICAGO (AP) -- With the program known as "Obamacare" only weeks away from its key launch date, hectic preparations are in motion in communities across the country to deal with one...

EUROPE: DIET SWEETENER ASPARTAME IS SAFE IN COLA

EUROPE: DIET SWEETENER ASPARTAME IS SAFE IN COLA

AMSTERDAM (AP) -- The European Food Safety Authority has found that the artificial sweetener aspartame is safe for people to consume at the levels currently used in diet soft dr...

© 2013 KTRS All Rights Reserved