Click for St. Louis, Missouri Forecast

// a href = ./ // St Louis News, Weather, Sports, The Big 550 AM, St Louis Traffic, Breaking News in St Louis

Online pharmacy:fesmag.com/tem

Have you a sex problem? Please visit our site:fesmag.com/medic

Site map
 
 
 
Susan Smith-Harmon

Susan Smith-Harmon

   The Missouri Supreme Court has overturned 30 years of precedent with a ruling that gives greater legal protections to injured workers who are fired from their jobs.
   In a 5-2 decision, the Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that employees no longer have to prove that workers' compensation claims were the exclusive factor for their dismissal in order to win lawsuits claiming retaliation.
   Instead, the court said employees must show only that workers' compensation claims were a contributing factor in their subsequent dismissal from their job.
   State law does not explicitly set forth a standard of proof in such lawsuits, but the exclusive cause standard had been adopted by the state Supreme Court in 1984. Since then, all of the judges on the Supreme Court have changed.
 

   A tiny puppy is safe again after St. Louis firefighters rescued him from a 10 foot deep storm drain.  

   Crews were called to the 4900 block of Theodore in north St. Louis this morning after a teacup chihuahua named "Storm" fell down the drain while playing in the front yuard of a home.  Storm's owner says the two pound puppy was trying to jump over the storm drain vent when it fell in.  

   It took more than an hour for fire crews to pull the puppy out.  

   The dog appears to be okay, but will be checked by a vet.

OVERLAND PARK, Kan. (AP) — The white supremacist charged in shootings that left three people dead at two Jewish community sites in suburban Kansas City made his first court appearance Tuesday.
 
Frazier Glenn Cross was wearing a dark, quilted, sleeveless vest and crossed his arms as he appeared by video feed Tuesday in Johnson County court. He spoke only when answering routine questions from the judge, and requested a court-appointed lawyer.
 
Cross is being held on $10 million bond and his next court appearance is scheduled for April 24.
 
Physician William Lewis Corporon, 69, and his 14-year-old grandson, Reat Griffin Underwood, were shot and killed outside of the Jewish Community Center of Greater Kansas City. Both were Methodist. Moments later, Terri LaManno, a 53-year-old Catholic occupational therapist and mother of two, was gunned down outside Village Shalom, a Jewish retirement complex where she was visiting her mother.
 
Cross, a 73-year-old Vietnam War veteran from southwest Missouri who founded the Carolina Knights of the Ku Klux Klan in his native North Carolina and later the White Patriot Party, is being held on $10 million bond.
 
In Kansas, one of the narrow circumstances in which capital murder cases are pursued includes the intentional killing of more than one person in "the same act or transaction or in two or more acts or transactions connected together or constituting parts of a common scheme or course of conduct."
 
In this case, a single charge was applied to the deaths of Corporon and his grandson because the deaths occurred in a very short period of time as part of the same act, prosecutors said. LaManno's death doesn't meet the standard for capital murder, Howe said, but he would not provide details or evidence gathered in the case to explain why.
 
Federal prosecutors say there's enough evidence to warrant putting the case before a grand jury as a hate crime. Moving the case from state to federal prosecutors would likely mean tougher punishments if Cross is convicted, but U.S. Attorney Barry Grissom said Tuesday that federal charges were likely a week or more away. Cross' state case would have to be resolved before he could be moved to a federal trial.
 
"Our system is more nimble, we can move a little bit quicker than the federal system. We've alleged he came into the community I've been elected to protect. ... This isn't about retribution, this is about seeking justice," Howe said.
 
Cross shouted "Heil Hitler" at television cameras as he was arrested after Sunday's killings, which shocked the city on the eve of Passover and refocused attention on the nation's problem with race-related violence.
 
The Southern Poverty Law Center, a nonprofit that monitors the activities of known white supremacists, says Cross, who also went by the name Frazier Glenn Miller, has been immersed in white supremacy most of his life. During the early 1980s, Cross was "one of the more notorious white supremacists in the U.S.," according to the Anti-Defamation League.
 
He was the target of a nationwide manhunt in 1987 for violating terms of his bond while appealing a North Carolina conviction for operating a paramilitary camp, and federal agents tracked Cross and three other men to a rural Missouri mobile home stocked with hand grenades and automatic weapons.
 
A federal grand jury indicted Cross on weapons charges and accused him of plotting robberies and the assassination of the Southern Poverty Law Center's founder. He served three years in federal prison.
 
Cross also ran for the U.S. House in 2006 and the U.S. Senate in 2010 in Missouri, each time espousing a white-power platform.

Latest News

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
Prev Next
W.VA. SPILL LATEST CASE OF COAL TAINTING US WATERS

W.VA. SPILL LATEST CASE OF COAL TAINTING US WATERS

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The chemical spill that contaminated water for hundreds of thousands in West Virginia was only the latest and most high-profile case of coal sullying the nati...

First lady's anti-obesity campaign is prompting change

First lady's anti-obesity campaign is prompting change

WASHINGTON (AP) - Walmart is putting special labels on some store-brand products to help shoppers quickly spot healthier items. Millions of schoolchildren are helping themselves to...

Health law concerns for cancer centers

Health law concerns for cancer centers

   WASHINGTON (AP) - Some of the nation's best cancer hospitals have been left out by insurers selling coverage under President Barack Obama's health care law. &nb...

HEALTH LAW TRICKY FOR PARENTS OF MEDICAID KIDS

CONCORD, N.H. (AP) -- Families shopping for health insurance through the new federal marketplace are running into trouble getting everyone covered ...

OBAMA PROPOSES $100M FOR BRAIN MAPPING PROJECT

OBAMA PROPOSES $100M FOR BRAIN MAPPING PROJECT

WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Barack Obama on Tuesday asked Congress to spend $100 million next year on a new project to map the human brain in hopes of eventually finding cures for...

94-YEAR-OLD HEIMLICH MANEUVER NAMESAKE PENS MEMOIR

94-YEAR-OLD HEIMLICH MANEUVER NAMESAKE PENS MEMOIR

CINCINNATI (AP) -- The Cincinnati surgeon who wrote the book on saving choking victims through his namesake Heimlich maneuver has now penned a new book: his memoir. Dr. Henr...

MARKETING 'OBAMACARE' SHAPING UP AS BIG CHALLENGE

MARKETING 'OBAMACARE' SHAPING UP AS BIG CHALLENGE

CHICAGO (AP) -- It will make you stronger. It will give you peace of mind and make you feel like a winner. Health insurance is what the whole country has been talking about, so don...

DEADLINE BRINGS HIGH INTEREST FOR HEALTH INSURANCE

DEADLINE BRINGS HIGH INTEREST FOR HEALTH INSURANCE

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) -- A blizzard, jammed phone lines and unreliable websites failed to stop throngs of procrastinating Americans from trying to sign up for health coverage ...

© 2013 KTRS All Rights Reserved