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Wednesday, 11 September 2013 02:44

SLPS scrambling to fill teacher vacancies

   The St. Louis Public Schools are looking for teachers.  The district is trying to replace more than 50 teachers who've resigned in the past 10 weeks.  District officials say half of the teachers who've resigned this year, did so after the first day of school.

   The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the 72-school city system faces two challenges in retaining quality teachers: lower pay than in neighboring districts, and greater challenges.  

   Rick Sullivan, president of the district’s Special Administrative Board, told the paper that keeping talented teachers and principals, and mentoring new hires, is a constant challenge in the district. 

Published in Local News

The St Louis School District anticipates more than 350 teaching vacancies for the 2013-2014 academic school year. They're looking for teachers  in all subject areas,  pre-school through grade 12. 

So they're holding a job fair this Saturday for only two hours --from eight until ten am and then will begin conducting interviews until  3:15. 

The job fair and interview will be at the Gateway Complex at 1200 N. Jefferson.

To become a SLPS teacher, candidates will need a Bachelor’s Degree or higher and Missouri Certification or Proof of Eligibility for Certification. Applicants attending the Job Fair are encouraged to bring multiple copies of their resume, certification, and/or passing Praxis scores. 

“The District anticipates more than 350 teaching vacancies for the 2013-2014 academic school year. We have been proactively and aggressively seeking the best and brightest teachers throughout various mid-western and southern states. The Human Resources Division is poised to have every classroom staffed with a highly qualified and certified teacher for the children of our district,” said Dr. James L. Henderson, Chief Human Resources Officer for St. Louis Public Schools. 

Pre-Registration for the Job Fair is requested and can be done online by visiting www.slps.org/hiringfair. For more information regarding the Fair and/or teaching positions, please contact the St. Louis Public School District’s Human Resources Division at (314) 345-2295. 

For certificated teachers who are unable to attend the Job Fair, but are interested in obtaining a teaching position, applications are being accepted online by visiting www.slps.org/careers. 

For more information regarding this release, please contact the St. Louis Public School District’s Office of Public Information at (314) 345-2227. 

 
Published in Local News

The first of more than 30 defendants expected to surrender Tuesday in Atlanta's school cheating scandal has turned herself in to authorities.

Fulton County Jail records show that Tameka Goodson was in custody early Tuesday after being booked into jail on charges of racketeering and making false statements and writings. Goodson was an instructional coach at Kennedy Middle School.

35 educators within the Atlanta school system, including former Superintendent Beverly Hall, were named in a 65-count indictment last week that alleges a broad conspiracy to cheat, conceal cheating and retaliate against whistleblowers in an effort to bolster student test scores and, as a result, receive bonuses for improved student performance.

Prosecutors set a Tuesday deadline for all defendants to surrender to authorities.

 
Published in National News
Teachers in two metro-east school districts will lose their jobs because of budget cuts. School boards in both Collinsville and Belleville District 201 voted for layoffs Monday night.

Collinsville schools will be hit the hardest, with district officials voting to eliminate 16 full-time and three part-time teaching positions.

The Belleville district will cut three full-time teachers and one part-timer.

Both district boards say they have no choice but to make the cuts because the State of Illinois has failed to meet their financial obligations to the districts.
Published in Local News

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