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St. Louis, MO  --  Two suspects are jailed in Pine Lawn after a routine traffic stop turned into a drug bust.  
 
Fox2 News reports that a man and a woman were stopped for speeding on Interstate 70 near Jennings Station Rd.  just after 3 o'clock Thursday morning.  
Police say they could smell pot as they approached the car. They were given permission to search the vehicle and found several pounds of the drug hidden beneath the liner of the trunk. 
 
The duo had bought the marijuana in Colorado and it is unknown at this time whether they were transporting it to Missouri or through the state.
In addition to packages, the pot was contained in cookies, brownies, chocolate bars and other candies.  A 24 year old man from Virginia and a  34 year old woman from Colorado are in custody.
 
Published in Local News
ST. LOUIS (AP) -- Few people are being fined or facing jail time for marijuana violations since St. Louis changed its law last summer.
 
The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that 127 people have been charged under a new city ordinance that reduced penalties for those caught with small amounts of marijuana. Just one person who pleaded guilty to a possession charge has been fined under the new ordinance.
 
Of cases that reached disposition, many resulted in suspended sentences.
 
The biggest proponent of the change, Alderman Shane Cohn, says the intent was to free up police and prosecutors to focus on more serious crimes while also lessening penalties and helping offenders avoid costs associated with cases that go to state court.
Published in Local News

St. Louis, MO (KTRS) - A Missouri lawmaker is hoping to start a conversation about legalizing the sale and use of cannabis in Missouri.

 

Democratic Representative Chris Kelly proposed a bill that would impose a 25 percent tax on the sale of marijuana for recreational use. The bill would also set up a licensing system for growers and sellers. Under Kelly's formula, St. Louis County could have 400 pot retailers, and another 127 in St. Louis city. The legislation would allow Missourians to keep up to a pound of cannabis, a pound of hashish and more than a half-gallon of hashish oil. Kelly does not hold out much hope of seeing the bill pass, but hopes to start a conversation.

 

The advocacy group Show-Me Cannabis, filed 13 petitions with the state that call for legalizing marijuana. 

Published in Local News

Mayor Francis Slay is asking St. Louis residents their thoughts on the legalization of marijuana.

At his blog, mayorslay.com, the Mayor asks respondents what effect they think legalization would have on crime stats and the state's economy. He also wants to know how people think the sale of marijuana should be regulated. St. Louis already treats the possession of small amounts of pot as a municipal crime--people caught with small amounts of the drug in the City are ordered to appear in city court, rather than being handcuffed and transported to jail.

You can share your thoughts by clicking here.

 

Published in Around Town

Mayor Francis Slay is asking St. Louis residents their thoughts on the legalization of marijuana.

At his blog, mayorslay.com, the Mayor asks respondents what effect they think legalization would have on crime stats and the state's economy. He also wants to know how people think the sale of marijuana should be regulated. St. Louis already treats the possession of small amounts of pot as a municipal crime--people caught with small amounts of the drug in the City are ordered to appear in city court, rather than being handcuffed and transported to jail.

You can share your thoughts by clicking here.

 

Published in Local News
Thursday, 14 November 2013 12:32

Siblings get long sentences for marijuana

FARMINGTON, Mo. (AP) - An eastern Missouri brother and sister have been sentenced to lengthy prison terms for growing marijuana in their apartment.

The Daily Journal newspaper in Park Hills, Mo. reports that 24-year-old David DePriest was sentenced Tuesday to 22 years in prison, and his 36-year-old sister, Natalie DePriest, received a 15-year sentence. Both lived in Farmington at the time of their arrest.

Their attorney, Dan Viets had asked for probation. Viets is state coordinator for the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws.

Assistant St. Francois County prosecutor Pat King had sought the maximum sentence against David DePriest, calling it a large-scale operation and noting that he had guns and bullet-proof vests. Viets said 12 plants and eight baby sprouts in a closet are not a large operation.

Published in Local News

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Missouri legislators who favor relaxing the state's marijuana laws are weighing a renewed push for reforms.

House Democrats Chris Kelly of Columbia and Rory Ellinger, of University City were among the speakers Thursday at a Columbia forum on marijuana policy.

Kelly and Ellinger backed legislation this year that would have made possession of small amounts of marijuana a low-level misdemeanor with no jail time, similar to a traffic ticket. Columbia and St. Louis already have such laws.

The Columbia Missourian reports Kelly says he would favor pursuing full legalization of marijuana only if there were enough organizational support from pro-legalization groups.

Kelly's also uncertain whether it would be wiser to seek legislative approval of lower penalties for marijuana possession or to put any proposed reforms on a statewide ballot.

Published in Local News

   Several St. Peters residents are calling for their alderman to resign after he was charged with marijuana possession.  Alderman Tommy Roberts was charged after St. Peters police found marijuana in his home August 7th.  

   The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that about a half-dozen residents called for Roberts resignation at Thursday night's meeting of the Board of Aldermen.  None of the aldermen responded to the comments last night.  

   Roberts, who has Hodgkin's lymphoma, a form of cancer, said shortly after his arrest that the marijuana possession was "a medical issue."

Published in Local News

Firefighters responding to a call in Park Hills, Missouri got more than they bargained for when they found a marijuana growing operation in the basement. The Daily Journal newspaper in Park Hills reports that emergency crews were called to the home when the resident's mother fell asleep with a lit cigarette, catching her mattress on fire. This happened early Saturday morning. After firefighters extinguished the blaze, they searched the home and reportedly found about 20 plants, as well as lighting and watering equipment in the basement. Formal charges have not yet been filed. 

Published in Local News

CHICAGO (AP) - If Illinois becomes the 19th state to legalize medical marijuana, experts say there may be scores of legal questions for businesses.

Crain's Chicago Business reports the bill that was approved by lawmakers in Springfield is prompting questions from observers.

The measure, which is awaiting Gov. Pat Quinn's signature, is being billed as the strictest in the nation. It's not clear if Quinn will sign it.

The measure's sponsor says there'd be minimal impact on employers with a zero-tolerance drug policy.

But critics say there could be legal issues related to hiring and firing workers who test positive for the drug or show up to work while they're impaired.

 

Published in Local News
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