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Thursday, 09 January 2014 03:14

Macy's closing Jamestown Mall store

   It's another blow to a struggling North County mall.  The Macy's store at Jamestown is closing.  A clearance sale begins Monday.  
   The announcement came Wednesday.  Macy's officials say its part of a reorganization that will save the company $100 million per year.  The company will close five under-performing stores and cut 2,500 jobs across the country.    
   A spokesperson for the retailer says many of the 88 Jamestown employees will be offered positions at other Macy's locations in the St. Louis area.  The rest will be given severance packages.  
   Currently, Macy's employs 175,000 employees and operates 841 stores nationwide.
 
Published in Local News
Tuesday, 15 October 2013 13:04

East St. Louis Firefighters avoid layoffs

14 East St. Louis firefighters will keep their jobs after the Firefighters Union and city officials reached an agreement over past due wages.

Mayor Alvin Parks says the firefighters agreed to take a deal that cuts a quarter-million dollars from their back pay. 14 firefighters, or about 1/3 of the city's force, had been targeted for layoffs on September 30. Union and city officials delayed the cuts until October 15 while they worked on an agreement.

Parks says he will use the $250,000 in savings to keep the firefighters on staff. 

Published in Local News
Thursday, 19 September 2013 01:31

Layoffs possible as Boeing ends C-17 production

   LOS ANGELES (AP) — Boeing Co. announced Wednesday that it will end production of its C-17 Globemaster III military cargo jet and close the final assembly plant in Long Beach in 2015, putting as many as 3,000 jobs at risk as orders plunged in the fragile world economy.  That includes about 300 workers in St. Louis.

   "Our customers around the world face very tough budget environments. While the desire for the C-17's capabilities is high, budgets cannot support additional purchases in the timing required to keep the production line open," Dennis Muilenburg, president and chief executive officer of Boeing Defense, Space & Security, said in a statement. "What's more, here in the United States the sequestration situation has created significant planning difficulties for our customers and the entire aerospace industry."

   Last week, the Long Beach plant delivered the last of 223 C-17s produced for the U.S. Air Force. Nan Bouchard, Boeing vice president and C-17 program manager, said the company will complete 22 final aircraft: seven for the Indian Air Force, two for an international customer that she declined to name, and 13 that have not yet been sold.

   "Despite strong international interest, we did not receive sufficient orders" to continue production, she said.

   Boeing said it expects the announcement to result in a charge of less than $100 million this quarter, and that will not impact financial guidance for the year.

   The company will begin reducing the C-17 workforce in 2014 at plants in Long Beach; Macon, Ga.; Mesa, Ariz.; and St. Louis. However, Boeing will make efforts to provide jobs elsewhere with the company, Bouchard said, and had plans to continue a repair and spare parts program for the planes through 2017 at least, Bouchard said.

   With modernization and upkeep, the big planes are expected to last for decades, she said.

   The massive, four-engine C-17 made its first flight in 1991, and military deliveries began about two years later. The plane is used to airlift tanks, supplies and troops as well as performing medical evacuations. It quickly became a war and disaster workhorse, prized for its ability to operate from basic airstrips and cover intercontinental distances with a full load without refueling.

   With a payload of 160,000 pounds, it is designed to airdrop 102 paratroopers and their equipment.

   Design work on the plane began at the million-plus square-foot Long Beach facility in 1981, when it was a McDonnell Douglas facility. Boeing merged with McDonnell Douglas in the 1990s. Boeing has so far delivered 257 planes worldwide, at a cost of about $311 million each when research, development and construction costs are included.

   The Long Beach plant has about 2,000 employees.

   "It will be sad that we're closing this last major production facility in Southern California but again, we're all very proud to be part of that heritage," Bouchard said.

   Boeing has about 20,000 employees in California, working on a variety of projects. That includes commercial aircraft, new markets such as cyber security and the largest satellite design and manufacturing factory in the world, Boeing said.

Published in Local News
Friday, 06 September 2013 04:10

ESL firefighter layoffs coming

   Seventeen East St. Louis firefighters will lose their jobs at the end of the month.  The Belleville News-Democrat reports that City Manager Deletra Hudson sent a letter to the firefighters saying the city  "has been forced to make some difficult financial decisions to meet its budgetary obligations."  

   The firefighters had been hired with federal grant money.  When the grant ran out in March, East St. Louis Mayor Alvin Parks said the city found some extra money to keep the firefighters on the job until the end of September.  

   Parks told the paper that he expects eight of the laid off firefighters to be called back when the new city budget kicks in January 1st.

   East St. Louis currently employs 54 firefighters.

Published in Local News

   An important healthcare safety net in St. Louis is laying off more than half its staff.  

   The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that St. Louis ConnectCare has issued 60 day layoff notices to 88 employees, including nurses and other medical personnel.  The non-profit organization runs an outpatient clinic at the former St. Louis Regional Medical Center and provides outpatient specialty medical services for the poor.  

   ConnectCare CEO Melody Eskridge told the Post that about 60 percent of the patients they serve are uninsured and about 23 percent receive Medicaid.  She says ConnectCare must reorganized because for financial reasons.

   Both Eskridge and St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay say the Missouri Legislatures failure to expand Medicaid is at least partly to blame for ConnectCare's bleak financial outlook.   

Published in Local News

   The Wentzville Fire Protection District board won't say what's behind it, but four senior officers are no longer with the department.  Three of them, including Fire Chief Randy Bornhop, had been placed on leave three months ago.  

   The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Bornhop has now resigned.  Assistant Chief Robb Watkins has been fired.   Fire Marshal Joseph Heitkamp is on indefinite unpaid leave.  And a fourth official, Fire Inspector Chris Newbold has also been laid off.  

   The leadership of the fire district has been in limbo since May when Bornhop, Watkins and Heitkamp were first placed on paid administrative leave.  

Published in Local News
Friday, 09 August 2013 13:07

Layoffs headed to Patch.com

The St. Louis Business Journal reports that layoffs with Patch.com are headed to St. Louis.

Across the company up to 500 employees are expected to lose their jobs and a total of 300 Patch sites could be closed. Patch employs 15 people to operate 24 Patch websites in the area.

Patch.com provides extremely local news. 

Published in Local News
Thursday, 13 June 2013 04:16

BJC Health Systems laying off 160

   The BJC Hospital group is laying off 160 employees from it's 13 hospitals.  

   BJC officals say the lay-offs necessary because of a decline in in-patient care.  The problem, they say, is that people are delaying treatments, some for lack of insurance, others because of high co-pays.

   Layoff notifications started going out Wednesday.  

   Most of those affected work in administrative and management positions.  BJC says those laid off will receive severance pay based on years of service.

Published in Local News

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Arch Coal Incorporated says it will scale back operations at two coal mining complexes in Kentucky and Virginia, trimming the work force by more than 100.

The St. Louis-based company said Friday the cutbacks will affect the Cumberland River and Hazard mining complexes.

Company spokeswoman Kim Link says the decision was due on "ongoing coal market challenges."

She says the curtailed operations will cost about 110 jobs — about 65 of them company positions and the rest contractor jobs not controlled by Arch.

The Cumberland River mining complex is in Letcher County in Kentucky and Wise County in Virginia. The Hazard Mining complex is in Perry County, Kentucky.

Link says those eligible workers who are laid off will be offered severance packages.

She says the two complexes still employ nearly 500 workers.

Published in Local News

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon is warning of employee layoffs and cuts to services if legislators pass a budget that reduces funding for the states' motor vehicle division.

Nixon said Wednesday that lawmakers were acting irresponsibly to put forward a budget that would fund the division for only the first two-thirds of the fiscal year that starts July 1.

Republican lawmakers said Tuesday that the partial funding was intended as an incentive for Nixon's administration to stop making electronic copies of personal documents of people applying for driver's licenses. They said lawmakers could provide the rest of the money when they return to the Capitol next January.

But Nixon called the partial-year funding unprecedented. The Democratic governor said he would treat it as an annual appropriation and cut accordingly.

 

Published in Local News
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