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   A settlement may be near in the class action lawsuit against Schnucks supermarkets stemming from a security breach that compromised more than 2 million customer credit and debit cards.  The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the judge will decide in the coming weeks if the deal Schnucks has agreed to is satisfactory.  

   But an attorney pursuing a federal lawsuit over the matter is asking the court to throw out the settlement, claiming it's unfair because proper discover hasn't been done and the full scope of the damages to Schnucks customers isn't known.  Attorney's involved in the local case deny that.

   Hackers breached the grocery chain's security between December 2012 and March 2013.

Published in Local News
Wednesday, 28 August 2013 02:41

Pro-Assad group hacks NY Times website

   Its back up now, but the New York Times website was unavailable for several hours Tuesday after an apparent hack attack.  Several people reported being redirected to a Syrian web domain when they tried to access the paper's website.  

   Marc Frons, chief information officer for The New York Times Company told the paper that the attack was carried out by a group known as "the Syrian Electronic Army, or someone trying very hard to be them."  The Syrian Electronic Army is a group of hackers who support President Bashar al-Assad of Syria.   The group attacked the company’s domain name registrar, Melbourne IT. 

   The S.E.A. also hacked the administrative contact information for Twitter’s domain name registry records and then tweeted about it.  Twitter reports that the attack affected one image server and that the problem has been corrected.

   On August 15, the group attacked The Washington Post’s Web site through a third-party service provided by a company called Outbrain. The S.E.A. also tried to hack CNN and succeeded in disrupting The Financial Times in May.

   The NY Times reports that this is the same group that had attacked Twitter accounts for dozens of outlets including The Associated Press. Those attacks caused the stock market to plunge after the group planted false tales of explosions at the White House.

 
Published in National News

  EDWARDSVILLE, Ill. (AP) - Southwestern Illinois officials say hackers may have accessed thousands of credit card n umbers used by people who bought tickets to Edwardsville's Wildey Theatre.

  Investigators say as many as 6,000 credit cards were compromised.

   Police Chief Jay Keeven says investigators still aren't sure of the full scope of the breach, but say there's no evidence that credit card numbers used to pay city utility bills, court fines or other fees were also accessed.

   The historic theater that opened in 1909 is owned by the city.

   Still, Keeven said investigators "strongly suggest" people who've conducted business with Edwardsville closely monitor their credit card statements.

   

Published in Local News

   Midwest BankCentre continues to respond to the security incident involving more than 100 loan applications.  

   Bank officials say they're in the process of contacting the affected individuals by phone or overnight mail to provide them with enrollment details for one free year of the LifeLock Ultimate service.  

   The Secret Service and the FBI investigations into the data breach are ongoing.  

   Bank officials say their own investigation is also underway.  They are encouraging customers with any questions about the breach or the LifeLock offer to call.

Published in Local News
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Police and South Korean officials were investigating the simultaneous shutdown Wednesday of computer networks at several major broadcasters and banks. While the cause wasn't immediately clear, speculation centered on a possible North Korean cyberattack.

The shutdown came days after North Korea blamed South Korea and the United States for cyberattacks that temporarily shut down websites in Pyongyang.

Officials at the two South Korean public broadcasters KBS and MBC said that all computers at their companies shut down at 2 p.m. (0500 GMT). The officials said the shutdown was not immediately causing any damage to their daily TV broadcasts.

The officials declined to give their names saying they were not authorized to speak media.

YTN cable news channel reported the company's internal computer network was completely paralyzed. Local TV showed workers staring at blank computer screens, and at one coffee shop employees asked for cash, saying their credit card machine wasn't working.

The state-run Korea Information Security Agency confirmed that computers at at least five South Korean companies were down. The agency was investigating what caused the outage.

Shinhan Bank, a lender of South Korea's fourth-largest banking group, said the bank's system, including online banking and automated teller machines, has stopped working since 2:20 p.m. Thursday. The company is unable to conduct any banking activities at bank windows to customers including retail banking and corporate banking.

The company does not know what caused the paralysis.

Immediate suspicion fell on North Korea.

Tensions between the neighboring countries are high following North Korea's recent nuclear test and U.N. sanctions that followed. Accusations of cyberattacks on the Korean Peninsula are not new. Seoul believes Pyongyang was behind at least two cyberattacks on local companies in 2011 and 2012.

Internet access in Pyongyang was intermittent at times last week, and Loxley Pacific Co., the broadband Internet provider for North Korea, said it was investigating an online attack that took down Pyongyang servers. A spokesman for the Bangkok-based company said Friday that it was not clear where the attack originated. Experts indicated it could take months to determine what happened and one analyst suggested hackers in China were a more likely culprit.

North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency blamed the shutdown on the United States and South Korea, accusing the allies of expanding an aggressive stance against Pyongyang into cyberspace with "intensive and persistent virus attacks."

South Korea denied the allegation and the U.S. military declined to comment.
Published in National News

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