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ST. LOUIS (AP) - A company that wants to build transmission lines to move wind energy from Kansas to Indiana has announced its proposed route through Missouri, but opponents say they'll continue the fight to keep the towers and lines away from their land.
 
Houston-based Clean Line Energy Partners hopes to begin construction as early as 2016 on its Grain Belt Express Clean Line. The company on Wednesday asked the Missouri Public Service Commission to approve the route through northern Missouri.
 
The route goes through eight counties: Buchanan, Clinton, Caldwell, Carroll, Chariton, Randolph, Monroe and Ralls.
 
Mark Lawlor of Clean Line says that in addition to providing access to clean energy, the project would create hundreds of jobs.
 
But many rural landowners say the project would reduce property values and create a health risk.
Published in Local News
Thursday, 12 December 2013 14:17

Environmental group plans to sue Ameren

ST. LOUIS (AP) - An environmental group says it plans to soon sue utility provider Ameren over what it calls repeated violations of federal air pollution standards.
 
The Sierra Club told Ameren Corp. it plans legal action in the next 60 days over what the group says are nearly 10,000 violations of the Clean Air Act since 2008 at coal-fired power plants in St. Louis, Jefferson and Franklin counties
 
The alleged violations involve the amount of soot released from smokestacks at the Meramec, Labadie and Rush Island plants.
 
A company official says Ameren follows EPA air pollution standards and that the excessive releases cited by the Sierra Club "occur infrequently."
 
Environmental groups have filed similar lawsuits in other states, including Illinois. The 60-day notice is required under federal law to allow for possible negotiations.
Published in Local News

ST. LOUIS (AP) - The U.S. government says Tyson Foods has agreed to pay roughly $4 million in civil penalties to settle alleged violations related to eight accidental releases of anhydrous ammonia that happened over a four-year span and caused one death.

 

The Justice Department and Environmental Protection Agency says the deal in a St. Louis federal court with the nation's biggest meat company involves alleged Clean Air Act violations at Tyson sites in Missouri, Kansas, Iowa and Nebraska.

 

The government says the incidents in questioned happened between 2006 and 2010.

 

Arkansas-based Tyson says it cooperated with the EPA and immediately addressed the agency's concerns.

 

As part of the settlement, Tyson also will provide $300,000 to help purchase emergency response equipment for fire departments in nine communities where it has plants.

Published in Local News

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