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   JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri's official consumer advocate wants regulators to publicly release information that could show whether Ameren Missouri has earned more than it's entitled to from its electricity rates.
   The request by Public Counsel Lewis Mills to the Missouri Public Service Commission deals with a report filed last November by the St. Louis-based utility company that has been kept confidential.
   In February, Noranda Aluminum and other Ameren customers filed a complaint alleging the utility was earning more than allowed by the regulatory commission. That complaint cited the confidential November report and asked the PSC to lower Ameren's allowable earnings - thus potentially cutting rates for consumers.
   Mills said in his recent filing that the public needs access to the confidential information to understand the basis for the allegation that Ameren is overearning.
 
Published in Local News
Ameren doesn't need an infrastructure surcharge. That's according to consumer advocacy groups which point to the utility's own financial data as proof.

The Consumer Council, a nonprofit consumer advocacy group, is arguing against passage of Missouri Senate Bill 207 that would allow Ameren to establish a surcharge in order to generate millions of dollars for infrastructure improvements.

Consumer groups argue that the extra revenue isn't needed since the utility earned well above it's authorized return limits in 2012. They also point to a $263 million rate increase that took effect in January.

Ameren officials say the higher than expected profits last year were due to unusual circumstances, like the extra-hot summer, and weren't enough to cover needed infrastructure improvements.
Published in Local News

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