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Missouri State House Members, St. Louis Aldermen, economists and fast-food workers are all at St. Louis city hall today to discuss the issue of fast-food workers forced onto public assistance due to low wages.

The group is hoping some policy solutions will result from such meetings.

The hearing comes just weeks after researchers at the University of California-Berkeley released a report showing that low-wage, fast-food jobs cost Missourians nearly $150 million every year in public assistance.

The workers want that burden taken off the taxpayers and put on the shoulders of their employers. Workers want higher wages so they don't have to rely on public programs, like food stamps, to survive.  

According to the UC-Berkeley report, McDonald's employees throughout the country use $1.2 billion in public assistance each year.  That is the most used by employees of a fast-food chain.

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