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Friday, 07 February 2014 02:14

NWS Storm Spotter training classes offered

   Storm spotters play an important role in monitoring the weather around the St. Louis area, especially during the spring storm season.  The National Weather Service is gearing up for spring by offering Storm Spotter training classes across the metro area.  
   The next class is Saturday at 9:00 a.m. at the Justice Center in St. Peters.  But if you want to be a registered storm spotter and can't make the class, there are 16 others scheduled across the metro area before the end of March.
   The classes are free and open to everyone, but only those who are high school age or older can sign up as a volunteer storm spotter.  Registration isn't required for most classes.  Check the National Weather Service's storm spotter class schedule for more information: http://www.crh.noaa.gov/lsx/?n=schedule.
Published in Local News
Tuesday, 26 November 2013 06:28

NWS updates tornado numbers

The National Weather Service has updated its numbers regarding the violent storms that ripped through the Midwest earlier this month.

The agency says two dozen tornadoes struck Illinois and another 28 hit Indiana. The latest figures underscore what officials have been saying since the tornadoes roared through on November 17th: There's never been a November day like that one on record.

The tornado that cut a half-mile swath through the central Illinois community of Washington is the strongest in November in Illinois since modern records began being kept in 1950. Six people died during the storms in Illinois and 147 people were injured. 

Published in Local News

The National Weather Service has increased the number of tornadoes that touched down in the St. Louis are last week to nine.

The largest and most damaging of the twisters was the EF-3 that cut a 32 mile path of destruction through St. Charles County and north St. Louis County.

Another EF-3 tornado his ripped through Roxana, Illinois, doing serious damage to the landfill. Macoupin County was hit by EF-2 and EF-1 twisters, with one severely damaging a high school gym in Gillispie.

Additionally, there were two EF-1 tornadoes in Franklin and Jefferson Counties, and three EF-0 tornadoes in Montgomery County

Published in Local News

ST. LOUIS (AP) — The National Weather Service confirms that at least one tornado barreled Friday night through portions of the St. Louis area as part of a storm that damaged dozens of homes but caused no serious injuries.

The weather service's Jayson Gosselin says the twister that hit portions of St. Charles County was an EF-3, which packed winds up to 165 miles per hour. A tornado of that magnitude also has been confirmed to have affected the Roxana area in Illinois' Madison County, northeast of St. Louis.

Gosselin says crews are trying to determine if damage in St. Louis County was also from a tornado.

Governor Jay Nixon has declared a state of emergency.

Ameren says over 50,000 homes are without power as of Sunday morning.

Published in Local News

   ST. LOUIS (AP) - Rivers in the nation's heartland are rising yet again, and with heavy rain in the forecast, parts of Iowa, Missouri and Illinois are bracing for another round of flooding.

   The National Weather Service said Wednesday that 2 to 4 inches of rain will be common as strong storms fire up through Friday; some areas could see up to 6 inches.

   How bad things get will depend on how much rain falls and where.

   The weather service says a worst-case scenario would be widespread heavy rain along the Mississippi River north of St. Louis, and along the Missouri River. The Mississippi and many of its tributaries are already above flood stage, and the Missouri is getting close.

   Forecasters say the Mississippi could reach its highest level at St. Louis in nearly two decades.

Published in Local News

The National Weather Service has confirmed that a tornado touched down in Hazelwood last night.

The official investigator is on the scene and has given a preliminary EF 2 rating to the twister. That classification means that sustained wind gusts were measure at 111 - 135 miles per hour.

The report says the tornado damage extends from the Coachlite Skating Center in Bridgeton along 270 all the way into Hazelwood.

No reports have been released on tornadoes reported to have hit Wildwood and Florissant.

Published in Local News
Friday, 08 March 2013 03:08

New England braces for late-winter storm

BOSTON (AP) -- Coastal towns in Massachusetts were bracing for powerful waves at morning high tide and commuters were facing a tough drive as a nor'easter offshore was bringing waves of snow, strong wind and water from the Atlantic to New England.

Snowfall of 8 to 12 inches was forecast in central Massachusetts and parts of Rhode Island by Friday morning, with 6 to 10 inches in Boston and nearby areas.

"We are watching a conveyor belt of wave after wave of snow coming in over the Atlantic," said Alan Dunham, meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Taunton, Mass. "The morning commute will definitely be a challenge," he said, especially for those headed into Boston from the south.

Powerful waves and high winds were expected to cause more trouble than snow.

In Scituate, Mass., a shoreline town about 30 miles south of Boston, emergency management officials were worried about getting through Friday's high tide.

"I think that's going to be very dangerous," said Scituate Police Chief Brian Stewart. He said the town had advised people in flood-prone areas to leave during high tides that began Thursday, when no major damage was reported.

"Why put yourself at risk?" he said. "Folks have been through this before, and they know what happens in these areas. We're recommending that people in areas that have experienced coastal flooding to evacuate three hours before high tide."

In Salisbury, Mass., on the New Hampshire border, officials ordered evacuations for homes along several beachfront streets flooded during a February blizzard.

A coastal flood warning was in effect for east-facing shores in Massachusetts, with possible 3-foot surges at high tide.

"The one we are watching is on Friday morning, after another 12 hours of strong northeasterly winds piling more water up," the National Weather Service's Dunham said.

On Cape Cod, where the storm was expected to be mostly rain, officials were concerned about beach erosion. The area suffered extensive erosion from Superstorm Sandy in October and a major snowstorm last month.

"We've really gotten more erosion in the last six months than we've experienced in the last decade," said Sandwich Town Manager George Dunham. "These three storms are really taking a toll."

Some less severe beach erosion was forecast along the southern Maine coast, and up to six inches of snow in southern Maine and New Hampshire.

In Connecticut, where up to 6 inches of snow was expected by Friday, people were hoping for a break after a snowy winter.

"I'm just wishing we'd be done with snow," said Steve Edwards, a contractor in Newtown. "We just finally saw some green grass."

The late-winter storm buried parts of the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic before sweeping into New England.

In Virginia, three people were killed, including a 22 year old man who died after his vehicle ran off an icy road. Up to 20 inches of snow piled up in central and western Virginia, which had more than 200,000 outages at the height of the storm. The storm dumped 2 feet of snow in parts of neighboring West Virginia, closing schools in more than half the state and leaving more than 20,000 customers without power. Two North Carolina boaters were missing offshore after a third crew member was rescued Wednesday.
Published in National News

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