Click for St. Louis, Missouri Forecast

// a href = ./ // St Louis News, Weather, Sports, The Big 550 AM, St Louis Traffic, Breaking News in St Louis

 
 
 

   Members of Governor Jay Nixon's staff will testify voluntarily this week before a Missouri House panel that had tried to subpoena them.  

   Republican Representative Stanley Cox says six current members of Nixon's administration and a former Revenue Department director will testify Tuesday and Wednesday.

   The panel is investigating the Revenue Department practice of making electronic copies of birth certificates, concealed gun permits and other personal documents of applicants for driver's licenses and state IDs.

Published in Local News

WARRENSBURG, Mo. (AP) — Governor Jay Nixon is joining President Barack Obama during his upcoming visit to the University of Central Missouri.

Obama is traveling Wednesday to the Warrensburg school and Galesburg, Illinois to make his case for spending on infrastructure and for universal pre-school programs. The president is also expected to highlight the economic benefits of overhauling immigration laws.

Nixon announced Saturday that he would join Obama during the Missouri stop. He noted that the University of Central Missouri is part of an Innovation Campus initiative that offers accelerated degrees in high-demand fields.

The trip will mark Obama's first visit to the state since a May 2012 commencement speech at Joplin High School. That visit marked the one-year anniversary of a deadly tornado that hit the southwestern Missouri city.

Published in Local News

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — There will be no immediate answer on how Missouri replaces a lieutenant governor who leaves partway through a term.

Governor Jay Nixon vetoed legislation to require a new lieutenant governor be selected during the next general election while an aide for the departing officeholder handles ministerial duties in the meantime. Under the vetoed bill, the lieutenant governor's responsibilities as Senate president were to be handled by a senator.

The Democratic governor says the measure would have created a "confusing and untenable process."

Missouri governors appoint replacements to other statewide offices, but there has been uncertainty about how the lieutenant governor should be succeeded.

Jason Smith, who now is a congressman, sponsored the Missouri legislation. He criticized the veto and says voters should be able to elect a new lieutenant governor.

Published in Local News

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri is adopting new wage requirements for construction projects on public roads and buildings.

Gov. Jay Nixon said Friday that he will allow a bill changing prevailing wage rates to take effect as law without his signature.

The prevailing wage essentially is a special minimum wage for public works projects. It's determined for each construction trade on a county-by-county basis according to voluntary surveys about wages.

But Republicans claim it leads to artificially high wages in rural areas when union rates get used.

The legislation divides the wage surveys by union and non-union contractors in rural counties, and bases the prevailing wage on whichever group reports more work hours. It also allows prior years' wages to be used when no surveys are returned.

 

Published in Local News

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon signed legislation that seeks to set up scholarships to help special-needs children get services from private facilities or other public schools.

The measure requires the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education to seek grants and donations to be used for the scholarships. The measure, called "Bryce's Law," is named after the 6-year-old autistic grandson of the legislation's sponsor, House member Dwight Scharnhorst. Bryce died of epilepsy in 2007.

Initially, the proposal was for a voucher-like initiative that would offer state tax credits for charitable contributions to provide scholarships for children to attend private centers. The revised version was added to a broader education measure this year.

Nixon signed the legislation Thursday.

 

Published in Local News

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has vetoed legislation that included designating part of Interstate 70 as "Graham's Picnic Rock Highway."

Nixon said in his veto message Thursday that the name refers to the Dr. Robert Graham, who owned the farm where the large rock is located.

The rock can be seen in the median of Interstate 70 roughly halfway between Columbia and the St. Louis region.

The governor said a popular outing during the 1880s was to drive horses and buggies to the rock for a picnic. But the rock also has been called "slave rock," which Nixon says comes from a belief that slave auctions occurred at the site.

Nixon says the highway designation would have elevated one part of the site's history above the others.

Published in Local News

   JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri Governor Jay Nixon vetoed legislation that would have expanded an infrastructure surcharge for gas companies.

   Gas utilities have been allowed to seek approval from the Public Service Commission to levy a surcharge for infrastructure replacements. The charge is levied between formal rate cases, and the gas companies must file for a more involved rate case every three years.

   The legislation would have required full rate cases every five years and would have increased the cap on how much gas companies could collect through the surcharge.

   Nixon said the legislation also would have allowed companies to recover from customers much of the uncollectable debt from customers who do not pay.

 
Published in Local News

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has signed seven bills dealing with the military and veterans.

Nixon was promoting four of the measures Wednesday during events in Springfield and Cape Girardeau.

One of the bills could help veterans qualify for lower in-state tuition rates at Missouri's public colleges and universities immediately after they leave the military.

Veterans with an honorable or general discharge will be required to "demonstrate presence and declare residency" to receive in-state tuition. Students currently must live in Missouri for 12 consecutive months, obtain a Missouri driver's license and earn at least $2,000 during a 12-month period.

Other newly signed measures are designed to help the state treasurer identify the owners of military medals that are unclaimed property and deal with voting by those overseas and in the military.

 

Published in Local News

ST. LOUIS (AP) - Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has signed legislation allowing parents more time to give up newborns, requiring screening for a heart defect and dealing with mandatory reporters of child abuse.

Nixon held a bill signing ceremony Tuesday at St. Louis Children's Hospital.

The legislation will permit parents up to 45 days instead of the current five days to give up their babies. And starting in 2014, screening for critical congenital heart disease will be required for infants.

Another newly signed bill seeks to close a loophole for child abuse reporting. Mandatory reporters suspecting child abuse or neglect currently must "immediately report" or "cause a report to be made." That means reporters can pass the information to another person in their organization. Information will now go directly to state officials.

 

Published in Local News

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has signed legislation that prohibits welfare recipients from using such funds at liquor stores, casinos or strip clubs.

The legislation also bars recipients from using cash benefits to buy anything marketed for adults while increasing penalties for people who are convicted of spending benefits improperly. The newly signed law brings Missouri into compliance with federal restrictions on purchases using Temporary Assistance for Needy Families electronic cash benefit cards.

Nixon said Monday the legislation ensures assistance for those in need is provided in a proper manner.

Supporters said the measure would help to prevent fraud and abuse in the welfare system. Critics had said it would create unnecessary restrictions on where people can buy food.

Published in Local News

Latest News

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
Prev Next
FDA will investigate added caffeine in foods

FDA will investigate added caffeine in foods

   WASHINGTON (AP) - Looking for a new way to get that jolt of caffeine energy? Food companies are betting snacks like potato chips, jelly beans and gum with a caffeinated kick cou...

HEALTH LAW TRICKY FOR PARENTS OF MEDICAID KIDS

CONCORD, N.H. (AP) -- Families shopping for health insurance through the new federal marketplace are running into trouble getting everyone covered ...

MORE SIGNS THAT US BIRTHS MAY HAVE STOPPED FALLING

MORE SIGNS THAT US BIRTHS MAY HAVE STOPPED FALLING

ATLANTA (AP) -- There's more evidence that U.S. births may be leveling off after years of decline. The number of babies born last year only slipped a little, and preliminary...

OBESE CANCER PATIENTS OFTEN SHORTED ON CHEMO DOSES

OBESE CANCER PATIENTS OFTEN SHORTED ON CHEMO DOSES

Obese people are less likely to survive cancer, and one reason may be a surprising inequality: The overweight are undertreated. Doctors often short them on chemotherapy by not b...

STUDY: ORGAN DONOR WITH RABIES HAD 2 RACCOON BITES

STUDY: ORGAN DONOR WITH RABIES HAD 2 RACCOON BITES

WASHINGTON (AP) -- An Air Force recruit whose organs were donated to four patients including a kidney recipient who died of rabies had at least two untreated raccoon bites several ...

UK STUDY: VIOLENCE MORE LIKELY AMONG VETS, TROOPS

UK STUDY: VIOLENCE MORE LIKELY AMONG VETS, TROOPS

LONDON (AP) -- Young men who have served in the British military are about three times more likely than civilians to have committed a violent offense, researchers reported Friday i...

New Illinois laws support diabetes research, reporting

New Illinois laws support diabetes research, reporting

   CHICAGO (AP) - A pair of new Illinois laws will fund diabetes research and track economic costs of the disease.    Gov. Pat Quinn signed the bills Thursday at a conference orga...

© 2013 KTRS All Rights Reserved