Click for St. Louis, Missouri Forecast

// a href = ./ // St Louis News, Weather, Sports, The Big 550 AM, St Louis Traffic, Breaking News in St Louis

 
 
 

Make a change or the dollars won't be there. That is the message from a financial review of the Wentzville Fire Protection District. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports the district could be out of money by the end of 2014 if changes are not made. The Post-Dispatch obtained the audit through a Sunshine Law request. The audit made 12 recommendations including that all capital spending be placed on hold until the district’s finances improve. At the end of 2012, the report says reserves totaled $1 million, which would cover only seven weeks of district operations. The internal review, prepared by Rognan & Associates, said the district has been spending more than it has been taking in since 2010, but “no mention of these deficits can be found in any district budget.”  The reports adds that a category referred to as “‘Money carried from prior year" appears to be disguising each year’s budget deficit from the board to the detriment of the district. The analysis advised that several spending procedures be reviewed, including the number of people who have access to district credit cards. It also suggested creating a policy regarding acceptable purchases made with the cards, and an accounting of voided checks, missing checks and checks used out of numerical sequence. The Post-Dispatch says the district’s attorney and spokesman, Dan McLaughlin, could not be reached for comment. It is unclear if any changes have been made to spending and accounting practices because of the review. According to the newspaper, the audit preceded the departure of four senior officers which included the resignation of Chief Randy Bornhop, the layoff of Fire Inspector Chris Newbold, the termination of Assistant Chief Robb Watkins and the placement of Fire Marshal Joseph Heitkamp on indefinite paid leave.

Published in Local News

Latest News

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
Prev Next
HHS GRANTS EXTRA TIME TO ENROLL FOR HEALTH CARE

HHS GRANTS EXTRA TIME TO ENROLL FOR HEALTH CARE

WASHINGTON (AP) -- People who've started applying for health insurance but aren't able to finish before the March 31 enrollment deadline will get extra time, the Obama administr...

THE DOWN AND DIRTY ABOUT NERVE AGENTS LIKE SARIN

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Secretary of State John Kerry said Monday that evidence of a large-scale chemical weapons attack in Syria was "undeniable." There are still many questions about ...

Study: Better TV might improve kids' behavior

Study: Better TV might improve kids' behavior

SEATTLE (AP) - A new study has found teaching parents to switch channels from violent shows to educational TV can improve preschoolers' behavior, even without getting them to watch...

US SUICIDE RATE ROSE SHARPLY AMONG MIDDLE-AGED

US SUICIDE RATE ROSE SHARPLY AMONG MIDDLE-AGED

NEW YORK (AP) -- The suicide rate among middle-aged Americans climbed a startling 28 percent in a decade, a period that included the recession and the mortgage crisis, the governme...

EUROPE: DIET SWEETENER ASPARTAME IS SAFE IN COLA

EUROPE: DIET SWEETENER ASPARTAME IS SAFE IN COLA

AMSTERDAM (AP) -- The European Food Safety Authority has found that the artificial sweetener aspartame is safe for people to consume at the levels currently used in diet soft dr...

STUDIES: LAB-GROWN NOSTRILS, VAGINAS WORKING WELL

STUDIES: LAB-GROWN NOSTRILS, VAGINAS WORKING WELL

LONDON (AP) -- Two new studies describe the latest achievements in growing body parts in a lab and transplanting them into people, this time with nostrils and vaginas. Windp...

FIRST LADY CALLS SUMMIT ON FOOD MARKETING

FIRST LADY CALLS SUMMIT ON FOOD MARKETING

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Michelle Obama wants food makers and entertainment companies to spend less time advertising sweet and salty foods to kids and more time promoting healthier optio...

OBESE CANCER PATIENTS OFTEN SHORTED ON CHEMO DOSES

OBESE CANCER PATIENTS OFTEN SHORTED ON CHEMO DOSES

Obese people are less likely to survive cancer, and one reason may be a surprising inequality: The overweight are undertreated. Doctors often short them on chemotherapy by not b...

© 2013 KTRS All Rights Reserved