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CHICAGO (AP) -- At age 80, retired Chicago physician and educator Dan Winship is getting a bittersweet last chance to teach about medicine - only this time he's the subject. In the early stages of Alzheimer's disease, Winship is giving a young medical student a close-up look at a devastating illness affecting millions of patients worldwide.

The two are part of a "buddy" program pairing doctors-to-be with dementia patients, pioneered at Northwestern University and adopted at a handful of other medical schools.

Besides offering students a unique perspective on a disease they're likely to encounter during their careers, the programs give patients a sense of purpose and a chance to stay socially engaged before their illness eventually robs their minds.

Winship and his "buddy," first-year medical student Jared Worthington, are building a friendship - dining together, visiting museums, chatting about Winship's medical career and Worthington's plans for his own.

The programs help erase the stigma of Alzheimer's and are laudable for introducing students to medical opportunities related to aging and dementia, said Beth Kallmyer, an Alzheimer's Association vice president who oversees outreach services.

More than 5 million Americans have Alzheimer's or some other form of dementia, a number that could triple by 2050, the group estimates.

Data presented at an Alzheimer's Association conference last year showed the programs are increasing medical students' knowledge of the disease beyond what they learn in the classroom.

About 75 percent of Northwestern students who participate become doctors in fields that deal with Alzheimer's patients, said program director Darby Morhardt.

For everyone, the diagnosis is a cruel blow. For Winship, it was nothing less.

"You can't remember anything," Winship said, sometimes faltering to find the right words. "You lose your ability ... to keep your wits about you."

Alzheimer's "wreaks havoc," he said. But Winship has grown to see it as a chance to meld his loves of medicine and teaching.

His career included stints as medical school dean at Chicago-based Loyola University; professorships at Rush Medical College and the University of Illinois in Chicago, and as an associate dean at the University of Missouri's medical school. He retired in 2010 from the American Medical Association.

Early last year, he got the dreaded diagnosis. Jean Schmidt Winship, 53, his wife of 10 years, says at first she thought his occasional forgetfulness and difficulty learning new computer programs were just signs of aging. But his symptoms gradually worsened.

Jean Winship scrambled to learn more about their options after the diagnosis and found the buddy program online.

"Everyone in the buddy program is very committed to understanding that people at this stage of any kind of dementia still need to live and enjoy life," she said. Alzheimer's "is not Dan, it's just a disease that he has. And so, that was huge for us ... realizing we have a lot of living to do here."

In the program, first-year students are matched for a school year with patients, based mostly on common interests.

Winship is an open, engaging man with twinkly dark eyes and a groomed salt-and-pepper beard. He was the first choice for many students who joined the program last fall, said Morhardt, the program founder and director. She had a hunch, though, that he and Jared Worthington would click.

Worthington, 25, from Ontario, Canada, is perhaps more reserved than his Texas-born mentor, but with obvious earnestness and empathy for what Winship is going through. Worthington's grandmother is in the later stages of Alzheimer's.

He said he hopes being a "buddy" will "inform how I interact with patients and hopefully treat them with more compassion and understanding."

"It's something scary and difficult but just because you have Alzheimer's doesn't mean that ... your life is over," Worthington said. "You can still contribute and give back and participate meaningfully."

During a recent visit to Chicago's Shedd Aquarium, he and Winship shared banter watching dolphins leaping in an indoor pool, and curiosity over the anatomy of colorful specimens in an ethereal jelly fish exhibit.

"I'm so fond of Jared because we talk together, we talk the same language. He is a very good student, he's learning and learning, learning and that means everything to me," Winship said.

Winship said he hopes the program will train a new generation of doctors to find new treatments "so we can do away with that stinking disease. "

For him, though, just hanging out with Jared "is the best part of all."

---

Follow AP Medical Writer Lindsey Tanner atHTTP://WWW.TWITTER.COM/LINDSEYTANNER

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CHICAGO (AP) -- Most people who abuse addictive prescription painkillers get them for free from friends or relatives, while drug dealers are a relatively uncommon source for those at highest risk for deadly overdoses, a government study found.

People who abuse the most frequently often doctor-shop; more than 1 in 4 who used these drugs almost daily said they had been prescribed by one or more physicians. Almost as many said they got them for free from friends or relatives; only 15 percent of the most frequent abusers said they bought the drugs from dealers or other strangers.

Those abusers "are probably using at much greater volumes and simply asking a friend for a pill now and then is not going to be sufficient," said Dr. Leonard Paulozzi, a researcher at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

According to the study, two-thirds of abusers said they used the drugs infrequently and well over half of these users said they got them free from friends or relatives.

Paulozzi and CDC colleagues analyzed four years of nationwide health surveys on nonmedical use of pain relievers including oxycodone and hydrocodone. These include the brand-name pills OxyContin and Vicodin, in a family of drugs called opioids - chemically similar to opium.

The study was published online Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Paulozzi said overall prevalence of nonmedical use of prescription opioid painkillers has held steady in recent years, at about 12 million, or 1 in 20 people aged 12 and older.

But previous CDC data show overdose deaths involving these drugs more than tripled from 1999 to 2010, with more than 16,000 deaths that year. By contrast, overdose deaths that involved heroin and cocaine totaled less than 8,000, and deaths that involved often-abused prescription drugs that include anti-anxiety medication totaled about 6,500.

A separate study in the same journal presents Tennessee - among states hardest hit by prescription drug abuse - as a snapshot of the problem. From 2007 through 2011, one-third of Tennessee's population filled an opioid prescription each year, the study found. Nearly 8 percent had used more than four prescribers and these abusers were more than six times more likely to have fatal overdoses than the least frequent users.

The larger nationwide study included data from annual government health surveys for 2008-2011 that included questions about use of these powerful painkillers.

"Nonmedical use was defined as use without a prescription or use with a prescription for the feeling or experience caused by the drug," the researchers said.

Paulozzi said the data don't indicate whether friends and relatives who offered free drugs shared their own prescriptions or had obtained the medication in some other way.

Public health messages have urged patients with legitimate prescriptions for addictive painkillers not to share the drugs and to turn in any leftovers to designated drop-off sites.

The new data suggest a need to strengthen messages to doctors to be on the watch for signs of prescription misuse, Paulozzi said.

Missouri tornado drill rescheduled for Thursday

Monday, 03 March 2014 16:11 Published in Local News
ST. LOUIS (AP) - The Missouri statewide tornado drill scheduled for Tuesday is being pushed back two days because of the recent winter weather and other factors.
 
The Missouri State Emergency Management Agency says the drill will now be at 1:30 p.m. Thursday. The drill is part of Missouri 2014 Severe Weather Awareness Week, which runs through Friday.
 
 March typically is the start of the tornado season and the drill will include the sounding of warning sirens. Residents are encouraged to seek shelter during the drill just as they would if an actual tornado was imminent.
   
 

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