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Susan Smith-Harmon

Susan Smith-Harmon

After a long wait, Seattle fans celebrate Seahawks

Monday, 03 February 2014 01:44 Published in National News
   SEATTLE (AP) — With shouts, cheers and fireworks, Seattle residents celebrated a dominant victory in the Super Bowl — the city's first major sports championship in more than 30 years.
   Thousands of people took to the streets throughout the city and Seattle police had an increased presence in many neighborhoods Sunday night.
   The Seahawks beat the Denver Broncos 43-8. The last time a major Seattle sports franchise won a championship was in 1979 when the Supersonics took the NBA title. The WNBA's Seattle Storm have won two championships, in 2004 and 2010.
   Fans blared horns and launched fireworks - and in the University District, near the University of Washington, fire crews extinguished at least one bonfire as rowdy fans were out in force.
   In Occidental Park in Pioneer Square, near CenturyLink Field where the Seahawks play, people waving "12th Man" flags took to the street, and others climbed trees and sculptures. Some fans got on top of a pergola, breaking glass.
   Fans in some neighborhoods blocked traffic, and in downtown a line of cars stretched for blocks as people cheered and horns blared.
   Seattle police spokesman Mark Jamieson said Sunday night the biggest concentrations of people were downtown and in the University District. He said no major disturbances had been reported.
   Senayet Woldemarian, a 29-year-old physical therapist from The north Seattle Suburb of Shoreline, shrieked giddily and waved her Seahawks flag at honking cars on a North Seattle street: "We got our first Super Bowl!"
   Her friend, wedding photographer Taylor Olcott, 28, said it reminded her a little of being in Boston in 2004, when the Red Sox won baseball's World Series for the first time since 1918.
   "This is the first time I've really seen Seattle passionate about anything," she said. "It's, like, East Coast. It's very exciting."
   Mayor Ed Murray said in a statement that a Seahawks victory parade would happen Wednesday.
   About 30 people watched the game at the Outlander Brewery in Seattle's Fremont neighborhood. It was such a blowout that by the fourth quarter, employees had switched one of the three TVs to Animal Planet's "Puppy Bowl."
   "We're all in euphoria right now," said Steve McVay, a 43-year-old Seattle IT worker. "It's a huge deal for the city. Since the Sonics we haven't won anything."
   John Caro and his wife, Corina, both 59, whooped their way down Lake City Way in North Seattle, high-fiving passersby.
   "I was born here, I was raised here! This is my ultimate dream!" Caro shouted. "We have waited so freakin' long for this!"
   With that, they stepped across the street, with Caro waving his gray Seahawks conference championship hat to stop the traffic.
CHICAGO (AP) — Gay and bisexual teen boys use illicit steroids at a rate almost six times higher than do straight kids, a "dramatic disparity" that points up a need to reach out to this group, researchers say.
 
Reasons for the differences are unclear. The study authors said it's possible gay and bi boys feel more pressure to achieve a bulked-up "ideal" male physique, or that they think muscle-building steroids will help them fend off bullies.
 
Overall, 21 percent of gay or bisexual boys said they had ever used steroids, versus 4 percent of straight boys. The difference was similar among those who reported moderate use — taking steroid pills or injections up to 40 times: 8 percent of gay or bi teens reported that amount, versus less than 2 percent of straight boys. The heaviest use — 40 or more times — was reported by 4 percent of gays or bi boys, compared with less than 1 percent of straight teens.
 
The study is billed as the first to examine the problem; previous research has found similar disparities for other substance abuse.
 
"It's a bit sad that we saw such a large health disparity," especially among the most frequent steroid users, said co-author Aaron Blashill, a psychologist and scientist with the Fenway Institute, the research arm of a Boston health center that treats gays and lesbians.
 
"Given the dramatic disparity ... it would seem that this is a population in which greater attention is needed," the authors said.
 
Their research was released Monday in the journal Pediatrics.
 
The nationally representative study is an analysis of government surveys from 2005 and 2007. It involved 17,250 teen boys aged 16 on average; almost 4 percent — 635 boys — were gay or bisexual. Blashill said it's likely more recent data would show the disparities persist.
 
Dr. Rob Garofalo, adolescent medicine chief at Lurie Children's Hospital in Chicago, said the differences aren't surprising, since it is known that gay youth often have "body image issues." But he said, "It is still shocking. These are dramatically high rates."
 
The Food and Drug Administration issued a consumer update in November warning that teens and steroids are "a dangerous combo," citing government data showing that about 5 percent of high school boys and 2 percent of high school girls use steroids — more than a half-million kids.
 
Steroids include synthetic versions of the male hormone testosterone. Users take them to promote muscle growth, strength and endurance. Side effects can include heart and liver problems, high blood pressure, acne and aggressive behavior. With their still-maturing bodies, teens face a heightened risk for problems that may be permanent, the FDA update.
 
Steroids are legally available only by prescription. There are few FDA-approved uses, including replacement of hormones in men who have unusually low levels.
 
Potential signs of abuse include mood swings, speedy muscle growth and even breast development in boys.
 
Garofalo said some of his gay and bi patients have admitted using steroids. Those patients sometimes have acne, high blood pressure, anxiety, or aggression related to steroid use, but those symptoms usually go away when the drug use stops, he said.
 
Kids are often less open about using steroids than about drinking or smoking marijuana, but the study helps raise awareness and the results suggest it's a topic physicians should be raising with their patients, especially gay and bi kids, Garofalo said.
 
___
 
Online: Pediatrics: http://www.pediatrics.org
   Friday is St. Louis County Police Chief Tim Fitch's last day on the job.  He's retiring after 34years in law enforcement in order to run his own security and law enforcement consulting firm.  
   Fitch was 18 years old when he started his police career in Cahokia, Illinois.  Three-years later he went to work for the St. Louis County Police Department.  
   Chief Fitch tells Fox 2 News that when he began his career, he never had aspirations to be chief of police.  "I wanted to Adam-12 guy," he said.  "Where you're just out there in a patrol car and handling the calls and arresting the bad guys and taking care of the good people of the community."   
   In 2009, he was made chief of police, a job that sometimes put him in the thick of county politics.  Chief Fitch says the positions he took on controversial issues wasn't about politics, but upholding the law.  "To me it wasn't much of a decision on what should I do, what should I speak out about, what should I stay silent about. It really was just, what's going right and wrong."
   Chief Fitch says he won't miss the politics of his job, but he will miss the people he worked with. "You can't work with people every day for as long as I have and not have some genuine affection for these people that we work with every day," ge said.  "So that's the part I'll miss the most."
   The St. Louis County Police Board will select his replacement during a closed-door session today.
 
 
 
 
 

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