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JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - The Missouri Senate has voted to override Gov. Jay Nixon's veto of an agriculture measure.

The legislation includes changes to Missouri's animal abuse and neglect law and a longer maximum prison sentence for stealing livestock. It also would replace a prohibition on foreign ownership of farmland with a 1 percent cap.

Nixon had objected to the provisions on foreign ownership and animal abuse.

The Senate voted 23-10 Wednesday to override the veto, sending the measure to the House, where 109 votes are needed to override. The House passed the bill earlier 133-21.

Proponents of the bill contend changes to the animal abuse and neglect law are needed and that tougher punishment for stealing livestock could help combat cattle rustling.

Published in Local News

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon is cheering the decision of lawmakers to sustain his veto of an income tax cut bill.

The House voted 94-67 Wednesday to override Nixon's veto, well short of the 109 votes needed for a two-thirds majority.

Nixon issued a statement Wednesday saying the vote was "a defining moment for our state and a victory for all Missourians."

He called the legislation "fiscally irresponsible" and asserted that it would have "defunded our schools and weakened our economy."

Fifteen Republicans joined Democrats in voting against the veto override.

Republican Party leaders had said the legislation was needed to help businesses compete with neighboring states that have recently cut taxes.

The bill would have gradually reduced income taxes both for businesses and individuals.

Published in Local News
Wednesday, 11 September 2013 02:16

MO income tax cut faces challenge in veto session

   JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - A Republican push to cut Missouri's income taxes faces resistance as lawmakers decide whether to override Gov. Jay Nixon's vetoes.

   The Republican-led Legislature convenes Wednesday for a veto override session. The tax cut is the highest profile issue out of Nixon's 33 vetoes.

   The legislation would phase-in hundreds of millions of dollars of income tax cuts for businesses and individuals. Republican legislative leaders say it would spur the economy and help Missouri compete against recent tax cuts in Kansas and other states.

   But Nixon says the lost revenues could jeopardize education funding. And he says a drafting error would impose sales taxes on prescription drugs.

   A veto override requires a two-thirds majority in both chambers. Supporters may fall short in the House, because several Republicans plan to vote "no."

 
Published in Local News

CAPE GIRARDEAU, Mo. (AP) - A Republican state representative from Sikeston has apologized for comparing Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon's support of his decision to veto a tax cut to Adolf Hitler's Nazi propaganda.

Rep. Holly Rehder made the comparison in an email to constituents last week. She issued a statement Monday apologizing to anyone who was "truly offended."

The 44-year-owner of a cable TV contracting company was elected to her first term in November. Rehder represent parts of Scott and Mississippi counties in southeast Missouri.

The Southeast Missourian reports that Rehder plans to vote for an override of Nixon's veto when the Legislature convenes in Jefferson City starting Wednesday.

 

Published in Local News
Tuesday, 10 September 2013 14:17

Governor Nixon speaks on veto session

One day ahead of the all-important veto session in Jefferson City, Governor Jay Nixon made a stop in the St. Louis area. Nixon spoke in front of the student body at Affton High School, congratulating them on their continued academic achievement.

After his speech, Nixon was asked his thoughts on the republican legislature's attempts to override his tax-cut and gun nullifacation vetoes.

"We're not in junior high here. This is serious business," said Nixon. "I don't look at it as a scoreboard, I look at the substance of the bills. This isn't about some sort of a back and forth, this is about what we should responsibly do as a state."

Nixon vetoed a total of 29 bills. The GOP supermajority in the legislature aims to override as many as possible. 

 

Published in Local News

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has no plans to call a special legislative session to craft a new version of a bill cutting income taxes.

Nixon spokesman Scott Holste said Wednesday that trying to put together a new bill at the last moment would be an irresponsible approach to a complex issue.

Nixon vetoed a bill earlier this year that would cut income taxes. Lawmakers are to convene Sept. 11 to consider overriding that veto.

Republican House member T.J. Berry, of Kearney, was the sponsor of that bill. He had asked Nixon to call a special session to begin the same day as the veto session. Berry says lawmakers could correct problems Nixon noted in the legislation.

Holste says Nixon is willing to work on the issue during the 2014 session.

 

Published in Local News
Tuesday, 03 September 2013 03:30

Analysis: Huge MO tax cut largely hypothetical

   JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Governor Jay Nixon says a clause in the income tax cut bill that he vetoed could have triggered a $1.2 billion run on the state treasury.

   Attorney General Chris Koster agreed with Nixon's legal analysis this past week. But the projection remains largely hypothetical.

   The Missouri bill would trigger a one-half of a percent reduction in state income tax rates if the federal government enacts a measure making it easier for states to collect online sales taxes.

   That bill has stalled in the U.S. House. But if it passes, then all of Missouri's roughly 2.8 million income taxpayers would have to amend three years of tax returns for Nixon's projections to hit in a single year.

   The courts likely would have to determine whether the retroactive tax refund is legal.

 
Published in Local News

   Texas Governor Rick Perry says that unless Missouri lawmakers override Governor Jay Nixon's veto of an income tax cut, he won't be the only governor trying to lure business from the Show-me State.  Perry made the comments Thursday evening while speaking at a pro-tax cut rally in Chesterfield.  

   Perry had spent the day in the St. Louis area pushing for the override of Nixon's veto of House Bill 253.

   Nixon crisscrossed the state Thursday, telling crowds that the tax cut would imperil critical services like education and risk the state's Triple-A tax rating. 

   Both men spent Thursday morning discussing their positions with McGraw Milhaven on his KTRS morning show.  Nixon continued to criticize the Texas Governor for trying to "poach" business, while Perry said it's merely competition in a very competitive arena.

   Perry also told McGraw that $40 million in business leaves Missouri for Texas every year, although he could not name any specific business. Nixon contests that figure.

   The Missouri Governor said the bottom line is that states should be competing against the world for a piece of the economic pie, not slicing into each other's portion.

   The story made national headlines after KTRS management rejected Perry's ad campaign aimed at convincing Missouri businesses to move to the Lone Star state.
Published in Local News

   CONWAY, Mo. (AP) - Gov. Jay Nixon is asking the federal government to issue a major disaster declaration for 22 southern Missouri counties hit hard by this month's floods.

   Nixon said Tuesday the costs of emergency response and repairs will be high.

   The floods that resulted from nearly two weeks of heavy rain caused widespread damage across the southern tier and left at least three people dead.

   Nixon announced his request in Conway, where the waste water treatment system was heavily damaged.

   The governor is asking the federal government to clear the way for individual and public assistance in 14 counties, public assistance in four counties and individual assistance in four others.

   Individual assistance allows households to seek federal aid for uninsured losses. Public assistance allows local governments to seek help with response and recovery expenses.

 
Published in Local News

Governor Jay Nixon says Texas Governor Rick Perry crossed the line when he voiced an ad that is airing across Missouri. The ad tries to lure businesses to Texas by slamming Missouri's tax policy. Governor Nixon does not appreciate the message and says it demonstrates that Perry does not have a good understanding of the reality confronting leaders.

"Anybody who thinks that the future is going to be made by state-against-state pettiness doesn't understand that there are factories opening up in China, that there are kids in school in France, that we have to compete to win the future," said Nixon.

Perry is running the ads ahead of a trip to the Show-me-State in which he will rally Missouri lawmakers to override Governor Nixon's veto of a bill that would have lowered some taxes and raised other.

Nixon had recommendations on what the governor do in Missouri. "When he comes, he [should] go to a store and buy something because he'll notice it's cheaper in Missouri because we have a lower sales tax rate," said Nixon. "And when he's here, maybe he ought to look at buying a house, because our property taxes are way lower than they are in Texas. And he won't have any trouble getting somebody who can help him add up the numbers, because our kids' ACT scores are way higher than they are in Texas."

Lawmakers meet on September 11 to decide which bills they will try to override.

 

Published in Local News

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